State pushes to improve Minnesota's can-recycling rates

  • Article by: Dee DePass , Star Tribune
  • Updated: August 24, 2013 - 10:09 PM

An exhibit at the State Fair underlines an effort to increase Minnesotans’ recycling rate of cans from a paltry 40 percent.

  • 25
  • Comments

  • Results per page:
donm251Aug. 23, 13 8:45 PM

Start up RV (redemption value), like some other states have. Not only does it increase recycling, but also cleans up the streets from litter.

12
7
LilBeaverAug. 23, 13 9:05 PM

Iowa has had it for years not only on cans but beverage bottles for everything except water and fruit juice. the deposit is five cents per container and are redeemable at redemption sites, grocery stores, convenience stores etc., but on the other hand leave it to the Minnesota legislature to enact legislation and they will screw it up beyond recognition!

12
5
asmithe2Aug. 23, 13 9:08 PM

In Iowa and Michigan where the deposits are in place, they recycle close to 90 percent, and they have thriving secondary markets with lots of jobs. But I guess the convenience of just throwing away cans is better than having less recyclable in the waste stream and all those jobs.

7
5
erikj3Aug. 23, 13 9:14 PM

Maybe if you could get 5 cents per can, people would start recycling more.

6
4
alanam8Aug. 23, 13 9:23 PM

One of the reasons for the high recycling rate in other states is that it offers an incentive for people in states with no redemption law to drive their cans over the border. So, in reality, the high rate reported in those states likely is distorted by the deposit incentive. That's not a reason NOT to do it, but I suspect - if and when Minnesota implements a deposit law - you'll see a corresponding dip in Iowa's numbers.

12
3
arspartzAug. 23, 1310:23 PM

This smells like a tax.

11
8
asmithe2Aug. 23, 1311:14 PM

It is a tax only on people who chose to throw away the containers upon which they pay the deposit. If you think it is a tax, you can either get a 100 percent "tax break" by redeeming your containers, or you can avoid the tax by not buying beverages in recyclable containers. The beverage industry was told by the state six years ago to get the recycling rate up, and the dial hasn't moved an inch. Their time of providing "leadership" on this issue is over. It is time for the people to step in and demand that we do something about our anemic recycling rate. If democrats truly care about the environment, they will enact a beverage container deposit. And if republicans truly care about creating jobs, they will lead us in that way as well. Its a win-win for everyone.

8
10
mdcastleAug. 24, 1312:10 AM

So instead of putting my cans in the recycling container I'd have to haul them all back to the grocery store or pay a huge "tax"? Great, still waiting for a single proposal from the tree huggers that doesn't make things massively more inconvenient and/or expensive for the public.

14
10
mdachsAug. 24, 13 1:03 AM

Having lived in a state that had can and bottle deposits, returning these to stores is a big hassle - and they generally require you to rinse the items. And, check out some of the companies in the waste management business - they are not going to give up revenue they can gain from recycling ferrous metals. They include sorting machines in their processing of waste, so they can pull out cans, etc. to sell that waste. So, why should we consumers waste out time and energy separating waste, when the waste management companies can do that with machines? And sell the waste products to generate revenue for their companies? Why should consumers add to the revenue streams of waste management companies that have machinery to do the separating - when consumers are already paying for trash collection? These pushes for consumer recycling are just another politically correct "greenie" propaganda.

7
8
imasayinAug. 24, 13 4:03 AM

One more thing to consider. When the Waste Removal companies no longer get the revenue from the aluminum, they will not be happy. Consider how Mpls will charge you with a crime if you are caught driving around and taking 'their' recycling

7
3

Comment on this story   |  

ADVERTISEMENT

Connect with twitterConnect with facebookConnect with Google+Connect with PinterestConnect with PinterestConnect with RssfeedConnect with email newsletters

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT