Want everything? You'll always fail

  • Article by: ROSS LEVIN
  • Updated: June 28, 2008 - 8:53 PM

No matter how productive we are, a feeling of satisfaction is an impossibility so long as we keep chasing more possessions.

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mbpuckettJun. 28, 08 4:33 PM

But Republicans will ruin the nation trying!

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mbpuckettJun. 28, 08 4:36 PM

Excuse me? I personally know a few wealthy people who have inherited virtually every penny; they have NOT worked. And, Ross Levin, are you going to tell me that a person who works hard in Guatemala will end up with as much as a person who works hard in the USA? The playing field is so uneven as to make your assertion risible, absurd. It is the statement of one who lives inside a fantasy bubble.

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franphelanJun. 28, 08 9:40 PM

Great story. I grew up on welfare, started my own business and am now a multi millionaire here in Mpls. I give more than 10 percent to charity each yr. And will leave most of my estate to charity. Democrats have damaged the USA just as much as any Republican. And the majority of wealthy folks have worked for their money. Be a giver your whole life and it will return to you a full measure pressed down and flowing over for the measure you use to give it will be measured back to you.

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guffmanJun. 28, 0810:22 PM

This article makes an attempt to "share" wisdom but becomes preaching in tone. It tells one what SHOULD be done and how it is virtuous to "conserve". I hope that people learn their lessons in life and determine, for themselves, what should and should not be done. I do not make choices for others; instead, I make them for myself and my family. People earn their money and should be the sole determiners of how it is spent. I would hope that people would find the great reward in giving. I think it important for my life and for sharing, but that is my decision alone. Telling people not to work toward something, but to conserve, is not the place of a newspaper. In addition, those who think that equality of opportunity in the USA equals the equality of outcome are sadly living a Utopian dream. Guatemala is not the USA. They have their own issues to contend with. If people don't earn as much there, they may consider moving to a better economic climate. Again, it is up to them to better their own circumstance. Why punish those who are successful? Why make them evil for achieving more?

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aljoannetJun. 28, 0810:31 PM

It is my observation that wealthy people either inherited their wealth or they stole it, if you steal a million dollars from one source you are a criminal if you steal a dollar from a million people you are a entrepreneur.

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BravehartJun. 29, 08 6:18 AM

This is my newly adobted philosophy. Many truism in this article apply/applied to me. Now, at 56 I think differently. I also have compared with slight envy, although realizing someone else will always be on a higher rung economically. That's OK. I eat well, sleep well, and enjoy family and friends' Today I enjoy The Luxury of Enough!

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digalvinJun. 29, 08 8:26 AM

It's good to offer such advice and remind people of the psychology as well as the economy behind their choices. Unfortunately though the pocketbook is willing, the spirit is weak. The problem greater than self-imposed competetive spending and the pop culture/media & advertising that promotes such attitudes. American style capitalism depends on mass consumption and "keeping up with the Jones". In fact the entire system known as "the American Way" is based on not being content with who/what you are, having more and showing it. It's practically un-American to not be part of this either as a producer or consumer. Hence the knee-jerk reactions and "hippy-wackko" lables. Even "going green" is frowned on as un-American because it implies using less and buying less.

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RipAndersonJun. 29, 08 9:47 AM

Many of people "going green" don't necessarily use less or buy less. Many "green" Hollywood elitists, for example, put solar panels costing in the high 5 figures on their multi-million dollar 4th homes in the wilderness.

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markpear19Jun. 29, 08 1:22 PM

was that the largest payoff went to trust or loayalty. In my understanding, there isn't enough evidence to convict without a confession, so if neither confess they both go free... the dilemma would appear as follows: -neither inmate confesses, they both go free -one inmate confesses and gets a 1 year sentence for cooperating, while the "non-confessor" gets 10 years -both confess and get 5 years each (As I recall)It was taught to me in this way to illustrate how we will often pass up the most favorable option to protect ourselves. I'm 100% open to being wrong on this.

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pizann0Jun. 29, 08 4:49 PM

"We instead found remarkable enjoyment using many of the things for which our taxes pay -- the state parks, the lakes, the bike paths." Oddly enough the person paying taxes to enjoy the parks, the lakes, and the bike paths, has a better chance today, than 10 years ago, of becoming a victim of an assault or robbery. See, happy taxes also pay for people to watch out for the good, happy-tax people; who enjoy the parks, the lakes and the bike paths. These people are called the police. Being safe to enjoy the parks, the lakes, and the bike paths when ever I feel like; that's where I want my taxes to go.

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