Minnesota will benefit from school attendance age change

  • Article by: Editorial Board , Star Tribune
  • Updated: August 19, 2013 - 6:20 AM

Beginning in the 2014-15 school year, Minnesota youths must stay in school until age 17 — a year longer than current law requires. The change, passed quietly during the 2013 Legislative session, moves Minnesota in a long-overdue direction.

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petepelosiAug. 18, 13 6:53 PM

Wrong, editorial board. This may sound good and be a feel good deal, but it will not make a bit of difference.....NONE.

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jackpine091Aug. 18, 13 6:57 PM

This is the worst idea ever. There are thousands of in school drop outs in Minnesota. Requiring them to sit in class while they don't want to learn just leads to disruptions and trouble. It is not fair to the other students who want an education.

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tmrichardsonAug. 18, 13 8:19 PM

I agree with the STRIB position completely. People are assuming that drop outs are exclusvely trouble makers or somehow a drag on the education of the rest of the kids--but that's not accurate. Just as many slackers ride it out to disrupt classs and avoid taking advantage of the fee education for a full 18 years as drop out. Some halfway decent students drop out too. The big difference? Kids that drop out at 17 instead of 16 have a lot easier time finishing up or getting their GED when the world knocks them off their feet and come to realize their mistake thank do kids that drop out at 16.

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rlwr51Aug. 18, 1310:35 PM

It used to be you could make it dropping out at 16, not any more.

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jurburAug. 19, 13 8:29 AM

More business for the truancy courts in high school.

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bluebird227Aug. 19, 13 9:36 AM

Kids that are dropping out at 16 are doing so because they feel hopeless. They haven't passed enough classes to earn enough credit to have any hope of graduating with their class. Making them stay another year isn't going to miraculously get them on track. You can force them to attend until 17 or 18, but it isn't going to solve the problem. They won't graduate with a diploma.

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corruptalienAug. 19, 1310:22 AM

How about giving them the option to join the US Marines?

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davehougAug. 19, 1311:05 AM

THIS is why "every full time job should pay a living wage" just doesn't work. Two people one with stellar qualifications and a dropout with petty crime history are NOT worth the same to an employer. If every job must pay well then the ex-cons, drop-outs, and folks struggling to get back on their feet after setbacks just won't find an employer willing to take a risk with them. Others are a safer bet to be a good employee and will get paid well.

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davehougAug. 19, 1311:07 AM

Heckuva time to come off the street and say "I didn't earn a diploma and I don't have any skills, please hire me". Used to be able to say that and get a decent job, but no more.

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analwartzAug. 19, 1311:23 AM

Minnesota will benefit from school attendance age change???? Who in Minnesota will benfit from this other than the unions?

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