Capella Education gains U.S. approval for self-paced degree track

  • Article by: Steve Alexander , Star Tribune
  • Updated: August 12, 2013 - 9:05 PM

The company hopes FlexPath will save students time and money, and renew its growth.

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luzhishenAug. 12, 13 9:14 PM

"Under the FlexPath program, students wouldn’t “test out” of classes to get credits, as college students have done for decades, Gilligan said. Instead, they would write papers and demonstrate to faculty members that they had mastered concepts, such as how to read and use a balance sheet." The details of the assessment will determine whether or not this is degree means anything. Unless the faculty are there to observe the product being prepared, it's going to be highly suspect.

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hazzzeeAug. 13, 13 8:21 AM

I would never consider a resume that has an online only degree. Never.

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raineyrooAug. 13, 13 9:08 AM

Save your money and get your degree out of a box of Cracker Jacks. It holds the same value and will save you a ton of money/time. As a hiring manager, I've only had two resumes get through HR to my desk that had one of these shady schools listed. My HR group filtered all the one's with University of Phoenix, Strayer, and all those other for-profit colleges. After looking at these individual's qualifications, I elected to pass. The vast majority of my peers in corporation that I work for, feel the same way. To save you time and money, I recommend getting an associates degree (providing you already have the work experience) from a vocational school or community college. Otherwise, get one from a traditional four-year school.

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decembersueAug. 13, 13 9:40 AM

This should never have been approved. These schools have horrific student loan default rates, and their degrees are less valuable in the marketplace than any of the state universities. Employers want people who can work well with others, and who bother to show up. they also want employees that challenge themselves, and have critical thinking skills. What kind of critical thinking goes into paying twice as much for a less well-regarded degree than one could have gotten at a State U? Student loans should only go to non-profits, period. We shouldn't be spending our tax dollars to line the pockets of these companies while their students rack up the debt. That 20k is deceptive; for that degree to mean anything, a student who finishes in three years would not have much time for a job. If you can do the degree in 3 years with a significant job, the school isn't challenging you enough, and the student is wasting their time. College isn't about taking tests, it's about bettering yourself and learning something. Imagine what a student who is smart enough to test out of most of their classes early in 3 years could accomplish if they went to a real school and took courses that actually challenged them. I guarantee you they'd make drastically more money in the long run if they did. Testing out is fine for a few classes, but when you build an entire degree around the idea, you're admitting you don't care whether the student actually improves themselves in the process.

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williewabbitAug. 13, 13 1:08 PM

I applaud Capella for bringing jobs to the state and becoming one of the big players in the business community. I doubt that this change in model or any other tweaks to their curriculum or program offerings will change the fact that other key players in the metro like 3M, United Health, Best Buy, Medtronic or General Mills prefer job candidates from schools that are not online and not for profit. When Xcel Energy hires a Capella University graduate to lead it--that's when the subject of an online degree will be taken seriously at a cocktail party. Until then graduates of Capella will get the standard "Good for you!" when they tell a hiring manager they got a fancy new degree.

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EbuddyAug. 13, 13 3:00 PM

Many of you people need to get up to speed with the times. Classroom only education is no longer the only way to learn. Millions of Americans prove every day that a post secondary education is not necessarily the BEST measure of a person's intellect or ability to understand complex concepts and perform well in a job (in most vocations). Properly accredited institutions can reasonably be measured against one another, but only to a certain degree (pun intended). HR folks and hiring managers who consistently dismiss out of hand candidates merely because of the lack of a post secondary education or on the basis of where their post secondary education came from (again, for most positions)aren't doing there own jobs and are still living in the 80's.

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