Emerald ash borer treatments costing less, working better

  • Article by: LAURIE BLAKE , Star Tribune
  • Updated: August 8, 2013 - 10:14 PM

“There is no reason for a landscape ash tree to die from emerald ash borer anymore,” a researcher says.

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spartavilleAug. 8, 1310:16 PM

Good for Burnsville. I hope other cities consider extending rates to private home owners as well. Seems like a no brainer.

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sek2undrstndAug. 8, 1310:47 PM

Pesticide means any agent which will control or destroy any pest. I don't understand why anyone in Minneapolis would be opposed to an organic pesticide. Unless you like to pay more to have the trees cut down.

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betablueAug. 9, 1312:58 AM

But it's so much fun to chop down trees! After all, sometimes you have to kill something to save it...right? The city of St. Paul Park unnecessarily butchered two full-grown, beautiful, healthy ash trees on my boulevard two years ago, without either giving me warning or offering me the option of personally paying to treat the trees (I've since had three ash trees treated within the property line; heaven help anyone who tries to cut those beauties down!): I cried then, and I'm still angry now.

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u4775Aug. 9, 13 7:10 AM

When they have demonstrated success in other cities, what is Minneapolis thinking? Neem based pesticides are about as natural as it gets I believe.

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otvallsAug. 9, 13 7:37 AM

The ash trees can be saved. This is not a situation like dutch elm, which is caused by a fungus whose spores travel with the wind large distances. The borer has to live and then crawl, not far, to a new tree. The pesticides for the emerald borer are medicine injected in the tree. It is not something that you spray and release all over the environment. To refuse to treat ash trees is the same as refusing to treat a sick pet on the grounds that if you scattered large amounts of the medicine all over a lake, say, it would harm the fish. Good for Burnsville and bad for Minneapolis!

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jd55604Aug. 9, 13 8:22 AM

The ash borer is already here and established in MN. Why are we spending a fortune trying to eradicate a pest that can't be eradicated? We have a lot of ash trees in this state. Inoculating millions of trees every other year for $250 per tree is not a solution.

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somamoonsAug. 9, 13 8:52 AM

I live in St. Paul on a street lined with mature ash trees along the boulevard (they are city trees, not privately owned). We've been informed that the trees will get cut down next summer. A lot of our neighbors bemoan this, but the fact is - many of these trees are rotting inside and already dying. You can tell because the tree canopies are full of dead branches and everytime a bad storm comes through, the trees drop big branches like crazy. I know it is sad to lose something that has been there for so long, but sometimes cutting them down is the right thing to do. Don't let a tree's age be your only reason for wanting to keep it. Get the opinions of multiple arborists on the health of the tree before bothering with inoculations against ash borer. You may wind up cutting down the tree anyway in a couple years because it has some other problem. Also, be aware that some tree companies prefer to recommend inoculations over removals because they make more money in the long run that way.

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mspshadowAug. 9, 13 8:56 AM

jd55604: "Inoculating millions of trees every other year for $250 per tree is not a solution."...I guess it depends on how much you value a full-grown ash tree. I know if I had one in my yard or boulevard, I'd gladly pay because I know that a replacement tree won't mature until well after I'm dead. Also, a full-grown ash tree in the yard would add value to my home if I were to sell it.

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somamoonsAug. 9, 13 9:33 AM

mspshadow - you could replace it with other types of trees that grow faster, such as maple, pine, or birch.

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markerminnAug. 9, 13 9:41 AM

Just had two beautiful Ash trees in my front yard treated. Yes, they are worth the $250 each every two years! It would take 20 years to grow replacements and I don't want to go without their beauty and shade.

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