Why do trees fall? Check water, roots

  • Article by: MARTIN HELLER
  • Updated: July 28, 2013 - 6:33 PM

I have been studying why large trees are falling after severe storms for years — not only here in Minnesota, but in other similar areas across the country (“Storm helps turn city into a lab for why trees fall,” July 26).

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irvine93Jul. 29, 13 9:45 AM

That was my original thought. Not that the roots were soaked in the previous rain, but that they got loose in the previous drought. This is why I have been watering the yard and, before the first frost, used a soaker hose around the Evergreen trees for several hours to soak the roots.

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FrankLJul. 29, 13 9:59 AM

A little help on how to accomplish this goal would be nice. Should a pipe be pounded into the ground and water fed through it so it goes deeper?

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idea77manJul. 29, 1312:12 PM

I think that you want ot reevaluate your conclusion. Based on my experience of farming and tree growing, you do not want to water trees after about ten years of growth. Between years 10 and 20, if there is no rain the roots will try to find the water in the deeper parts of the soil, thus getting them to a depth that will hold the bigger tree. So in a large city this is harder to do, with the storm sewers and sanitary sewers leaking water into the surrounding soil, thus only giving most trees in the city a root depth of 10 to 20 feet. Nearly not enough to hold a large older tree.

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