Jobless rate falls, but pain lingers in Minnesota

  • Article by: Editorial Board , Star Tribune
  • Updated: July 23, 2013 - 9:23 AM

Minnesota’s postrecession comeback is reason for optimism.

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garagewineJul. 22, 13 8:04 PM

"Three states — Nevada, Illinois and Mississippi — are still burdened with unemployment rates of 9 percent or higher, and 17 states have unemployment rates above the national average of 7.6 percent."----Uh, yeah. Whenever you have a statistical distribution of anything, there will always be a share of those things that are above average and below. The only thing that having 17 (of 50) states above the national average tells you is that the distribution of unemployment rates across states is not symmetric. It is not a measure of performance.

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bobblumenfelJul. 22, 13 9:50 PM

@garagewine: "-Uh, yeah. Whenever you have a statistical distribution of anything, there will always be a share of those things that are above average and below." Well said. Reminds me of the female Texas legislator a few years back who was aghast, as perhaps only a Texan can be, that half -- HALF, mind you -- of Texas school students were below average. Apparently, the good woman felt the law of averages should also be repealed in her state.

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elmore1Jul. 22, 1311:45 PM

With our low unemployment "advantage" I don't understand why our taxes remain so high. Must be the "tax and spend" majority party.

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arspartzJul. 23, 1312:24 AM

This is not a recovery. Most of the job losses were in manufacturing and other production based sectors, most of the jobs gained are in the service sectors. The latter do not pay as well, nor are the people who used to work in the former well suited for positions in the latter.

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phatcatpatJul. 23, 13 7:14 AM

Service workers. Temporary construction jobs. Contract (temporary) workers. There is nothing to brag about in MN.

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pitythefoolsJul. 23, 13 7:34 AM

elmore1: "With our low unemployment "advantage" I don't understand why our taxes remain so high. Must be the "tax and spend" majority party."

Or it could be that employers invest in people who invest in themselves.

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mspshadowJul. 23, 1310:12 AM

"The record-high number of temporary jobs in the state attests to continuing weakness in the job market"...although not ideal, this is usually a sign that things will improve. I've been laid-off in the past 5 out of 6 recessions and in each of those downturns, I was hired as a temporary (contract) employee. Those jobs eventually turned into decent permanent, fulltime jobs.

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pumiceJul. 23, 1310:21 AM

Thank you for the straightforward, balanced analysis of Minnesota's employment picture. One would think all Minnesotans would take pride in and encouragement from your conclusion: "As this recovery has progressed, Minnesota has reclaimed its customary employment advantage over the nation, something it appeared to lose in 2006-07. Sustainable self-sufficiency has not returned to all who seek it. But for those still searching, Minnesota’s employment gain is reason for hope."

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pumiceJul. 23, 1310:26 AM

From the editorial: "It’s also notable that in the most recent monthly tally, job growth was held to only 400 positions statewide not because of sluggish performance by the private sector but because of the continuing pinch in the public one. A 2,500-job increase in private hiring was offset by 2,100 government jobs lost." Multiply that job loss by 50 states, and one becomes aware that sequestration is negatively impacting the nation's economic recovery and has painful human consequences.

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Willy53Jul. 23, 1310:42 AM

Our recovery is riding a wave of productivity gains made by reducing wages, hiring peope at reduced salaries and cutting benefits. The economy is struggling because the middle class has no where near the disposable income it had before the abrupt wealth transfer during the Great Recession. Cutting government and spending also put an unnecessary strain on our state economy that not wise. The sad part: the better salaries and wages with better benefits are not coming back with the exception of health insurance which will improve and provide cheaper and better coverage.

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