Minnesota health plans pile up big reserves

  • Article by: Jackie Crosby , Star Tribune
  • Updated: July 15, 2013 - 9:04 PM

Minnesota’s nonprofit health insurers have accumulated nearly $2 billion, much more than state law requires, according to one analyst.

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chuckdancerJul. 16, 1310:29 AM

We don't need these companies. They are an extra layer and an extra cost in the system.

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ping303Jul. 16, 13 2:23 PM

It's a good thing "non-profit" health insurance companies have reserves. All of us on their high deductible plans can't afford to go to the doctor, so later on, they will have the money to pay for our more serious and chronic conditions they kept us from affording now. ping303

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DilbertJul. 22, 1311:31 AM

Even with such seemingly large reserves, the Non-Profits are likely a lot more efficient than simply having the Government handle it all. We have no idea what allowing pre-existing conditions and covering all of the mandated coverage is going to do to insurance usage - we simply lack an experience base, so better to start with 'excess' reserves than to end up scrambling to make new taxes to cover shortages...

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mpk1954Jul. 24, 13 6:05 AM

Julie Brunner head of the Mn council of health plans said in her letter of 7-22-13 that it is important to consider all the facts when looking at our HMOs. She is absolutely correct so lets look at the facts: 1) If all health plans are required to participate in public programs, why has Preferred One never done so and never been sanctioned for not participating? 2) All health care providers are presented with the same choice as the HMOs, participate in all public programs or none. It is as Ms. Brunner suggests a package deal for all of them(not just the HMOs) 3) Only the HMOs control and produce the data that is used to determine how much federal money is paid into our public programs. 4) HMO participation is tied to HMO licensure, a status the health plans can change at any time and they know this (look what they are doing with MNsure.) 5) Operating the programs as a"package deal" is in fact unlawful under federal law. The medicaid program must stand on its own. That's what the Segal audit said. 6) All health plan numbers and data are suspect because they are self-reported,unverified, and aggregated. These are the facts that require consideration.

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