Minnesota homelessness trends headed wrong way

  • Article by: ED MURPHY
  • Updated: July 12, 2013 - 7:58 PM

For several reasons, this is of particular concern outside the metro area.

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rlwr51Jul. 12, 13 8:30 PM

At least a part of the solution is jobs that pay a living wage, buying American products - bring back American jobs, quit buying from companies that don't pay a living wage and increase affordable housing... In 1970 Minimum wage was $1.60 - about $270/mo gross and you could rent a room for $50/mo or a nice 1 br apartment for $85/mo. Today Minnesota's minimum wage is $7.25/hr - about $1150/mo. gross and there is almost nothing, at least in the city, that can be rented for anything less than $1000/mo. Unless this turns around there will be even more homeless. Most of us are just a paycheck away.

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joeljyJul. 12, 1310:17 PM

Social Services in Minnesota have been cut to the bare bone, especially in mental health. This translates to increases in homeless adults.

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boris123Jul. 12, 1310:54 PM

Why would anyone expect a decrease in unemployment when you pay people not to work? A "living wage" "buying products made in America" and "affordable housing" are all market driven and market defined. As soon as you inject govt into the free enterprise system you inject politics which destroys competitive forces and all logic.

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elmore1Jul. 12, 1311:14 PM

We also need family and friends to step up like many of our ancestors did. More govt isn't always the best solution.

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mdachsJul. 13, 1312:08 AM

Businesses who offer jobs that require little or no skills and experience cannot be expected to pay employees a "living wage" - the value of jobs is based on the skills and experience of the people who do the jobs. If a business can train a person in a couple of weeks to run a cash register or stock shelves, the value of this work is very low. Employees who work in retail, fast food, and similar jobs cannot expect to be able to support themselves and a family on their wages. How many of you are willing to pay $1O for a Big Mac so employees at McDonalds can receive a wage that supports a family? Or $5 for a Coke or coffee at a gas station convenient mart? Businesses pay wages, based on the value of the work done and the prices that customers are willing to pay for the products they sell - they are not charities that pay wages that do not enable the business owners to draw income on which they can support their own families. Jobs that require no or little skills are not worth high wages. Many employees who work at fast food restaurants or retail stores do this work to provide a secondary income for spending money. And the profit margins in fast food and retail are very low. If you want to earn a so-called "living wage" that can support a family, then you need to acquire the skills and experience that justify a "living wage."

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supervon2Jul. 13, 13 6:36 AM

My daughter invited one of her friends to stay-it turns out her friend is unbelievably lazy and she will not even look for work unless told to. She's clean-no drugs, ect, not stupid, just lazy. I have basically laid down the statement no work in 60 days and she joins the homeless ranks. Her excuse? The government will take care of all my needs.

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furguson11Jul. 13, 13 7:20 AM

We need to start eyeballing zoning restrictions for small and secondary rental units that are more affordable. In New York, they are going to micro apartments. We could still do rooming houses, apartments over garages and tiny houses if we wished. The minimal square footage doesn't have to be 1,000 per unit.

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g5thistimeJul. 13, 1312:51 PM

Wait, you mean Dayton taking an additional 2 billion from Minnesotan's wealthiest didn't solve all of our problems. Next up, take from the middle class and give to the people that are just waiting for the government to take care of them!

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rlwr51Jul. 13, 13 4:37 PM

Just make it illegal to be homeless and put them in jail - problem solved. They'll get better medical care there too.

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rlwr51Jul. 13, 13 6:39 PM

mdachsJul. "Businesses who offer jobs that require little or no skills and experience cannot be expected to pay employees a "living wage" - the value of jobs is based on the skills and experience of the people who do the jobs. If a business can train a person in a couple of weeks to run a cash register or stock shelves, the value of this work is very low. Employees who work in retail, fast food, and similar jobs cannot expect to be able to support themselves and a family on their wages....." - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Even slaves got a roof over their head and at least enough food to keep them alive.... Big business and fast food chains have run smaller businesses (hardware stores, clothing stores and restaurants),by various means, that used to sustain the owners and their employees out of business. Once those businesses close the former owners and their employees have little choice but to go to work for these big business job "creators". There is only so long this can continue before big business owns everything including what you have.

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