Egypt's coup: Deserved, though challenging

  • Article by: Jeffrey Goldberg , Bloomberg
  • Updated: July 9, 2013 - 6:07 PM

A coup couldn’t have happened to a more deserving crowd. Actions have reactions.

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pumiceJul. 9, 13 6:59 PM

From the article: "But to keep the aid flowing, the White House and Congress would need to find an exception to their own rules, which require suspending aid to countries when their leaders are deposed by military force." Does this rule apply to all aid or only to military aid? For the millions of Egyptians who took to the streets to demand Morsi’s ouster, Egypt needs economic aid (of the Marshall Plan variety) more than it needs military aid.

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owatonnabillJul. 9, 13 7:27 PM

"Qaradawi’s vehement opposition to the Egyptian army’s ouster of Morsi makes me think that the millions of Egyptians who demanded his removal are on the right side of history." .................. Indeed. And not just millions. One needs to understand the scope to appreciate the perspective. Twenty-two million Egyptians signed the petition to remove Morsi--more than twice the number of Egyptians who actually voted for him. THIRTY million Egyptians took to the streets to protest Morsi's rule in what is easily the largest spontaneous demonstration in the history of humanity. They were protesting the autocratic rule of a man who, despite being democratically elected, was using that very process to place himself above the law and to subvert the very democracy which the people of Egypt chose him to lead. Democracy is the direct rule of the people. If the events leading to Morsi's ouster was NOT democracy in action--then what is?

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luzhishenJul. 10, 1312:47 AM

If the events leading to Morsi's ouster was NOT democracy in action--then what is? - an election. If the army decided to toss W or O out, you can be sure it would be a coup. Goldberg's baloney about Morsi's "internal coup" is right up there with WMD. Only the Israel-first crowd thinks it's okay for us to back up any and all military dictatorships they perceive as non-threatening, regardless of the long-term consequences.

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jgmanciniJul. 10, 13 8:07 AM

You can't compare the situation there to a "what-if-this-happened-to-the-US-president" scenario. Morsi turned himself into a dictator, suspended the constitution, and sealed his own fate. The Egyptian people had finally managed to rid themselves of Mubarek, only to watch the democracy they had fought so hard for be stolen away from them by the very person they elected to office. It doesn't matter what you call it--coup or military action or a democratic reset. It was the right thing for the Egyptian people and we should butt out.

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K-LinoJul. 10, 13 9:32 AM

Convert the military aid to economic/financial aid.

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ch1979Jul. 10, 1312:57 PM

jgmancini "You can't compare the situation there to a "what-if-this-happened-to-the-US-president" scenario. Morsi turned himself into a dictator, suspended the constitution, and sealed his own fate." Exactly! I don't care if it were Bush, Obama, or whomever. If they had done the same things as Morsi, I would have sided with our military's effort to have them removed!

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comment229Jul. 10, 13 4:03 PM

I wouldn't stop the aid to any country because of a coup or whatever you want to call it. I would stop all aid and ask Boehner to be the poster boy for this initiative in a public service announcement that has him blurting out "we are broke!"

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comment229Jul. 10, 13 4:07 PM

Finally, why don't we call "aid" what it really is; a bribe. Since when does the USA have to give money away for countries to "respect us?" Wanna guess where most of this money winds up?

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