A civil-rights tour, in perspective

  • Article by: Chuck Slocum
  • Updated: July 4, 2013 - 6:14 PM

By coincidence, we were visiting key sites in Alabama when the Voting Act ruling came down.

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pumiceJul. 4, 13 5:09 PM

From the article: "Critics of the court’s 5-4 split decision argue that the Voting Rights Act has been arguably the most effective civil-rights tool in American history. Backers of the opinion say the law’s provisions are no longer needed." From one of the articles on Justice Scalia: "[He] insists that laws must be interpreted in accordance with their ordinary public meaning — the meaning that their words had in the nation or community that enacted them." Applying Scalia's test to the ordinary public meaning of the language used in the law of the nation which enacted the Voting Rights Act, shouldn't Scalia have voted to support Section 5--if only to avoid the appearance of allowing political preference to dominate his judicial decision?

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orpheus90Jul. 4, 1310:04 PM

From the article: Much accomplished; much more to do .... It is not at all clear that with time comes change. Given it's 50 years on and basic conditions with regard to quality of life have barely changed in states like Alabama, it's time to start using the requisite judgement: Alabama, like many of its southern sister states, is a failed state and seems insistent to remain one. It is one of the future hurdles of this nation to challenge the very core of southern sensibility and drag it, kicking and screaming if necessary, into the current world. There's just no excuse anymore.

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maverick30usJul. 5, 1310:37 AM

As a pretty bright person, I am wondering why, when talking of "civil rights", the only people we talk about is the negro. Don't others who are here legally also have "civil rights"? How about the Asians or the Mexicans, or the Canadians or the Europeans? They all live here and also have civil rights. So why is it that we only talk about the negro. Just asking...

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ginny6Jul. 5, 1312:11 PM

@maverick30us --- ALL Americans are entitled to their civil rights. That's the whole point - that's what it means to be American. Doesn't matter your color, ethnicity, geography, income, country of origin, education level, political preference, type of work you do, employment status, gender, etc.

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ginny6Jul. 5, 1312:14 PM

Anyone who does not think there is voter suppression going on today--active, organized, and funded voter suppression, including voter suppression targeted at people of color--is either uninformed or in denial.

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smdentJul. 5, 13 2:02 PM

"So why is it that we only talk about the negro. Just asking..." - - - Perhaps it's because African-American have suffered far more discrimination, abuse, and hatred than any other segment of our population. Sure, others have suffered, but not near to the extent of our black fellow citizens.

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tbdbitl7881Jul. 5, 13 2:18 PM

There is voter suppression goig on today, but not necessarily in the South. The election of 2012 is a great case in point; there were several precincts in various states that had over 100% voter turnout, ALL (unanimously) for 0bama. Let us not forget the Black Panthers' intimidation of voters outside some Pennsylvania precincts.

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braxozJul. 5, 13 3:54 PM

tbdbitl7881 Jul. 5, 13 2:18 PM There is voter suppression goig on today, but not necessarily in the South. The election of 2012 is a great case in point; there were several precincts in various states that had over 100% voter turnout, ALL (unanimously) for 0bama._________ Please give an example. Yes, there were precincts that voted unanimously for Obama e.g. Philadelphia where several precincts are close to 100% Black. (one had 12 registered Republicans, none of whom voted). I would not be surprised if there were precincts in Utah that voted unanimously for Romney - I also doubt they had to wait in line several hours to do so.

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