Ecuador president tells AP: Snowden 'under care' of Russia, can't leave Moscow

  • Article by: MICHAEL WEISSENSTEIN , Associated Press
  • Updated: June 30, 2013 - 4:49 PM

PORTOVIEJO, Ecuador — Edward Snowden is "under the care of the Russian authorities" and can't leave Moscow's international airport without their consent, Ecuadorean President Rafael Correa told The Associated Press Sunday in an interview telegraphing the slim and diminishing possibility that the National Security Agency leaker will end up in Ecuador.

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formergopJun. 30, 1310:28 AM

I hope the traitor finds the Russian airport comfy.

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sblodenJun. 30, 1311:10 AM

Would you rather spend your 30's and beyond in the basement of a Moscow airport or in a U.S. Federal prison? Sometimes you realize you have severely limited your options.

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hobie2Jun. 30, 1312:31 PM

Odd comment.. up until a few hours ago, one doesn't need a passport to enter a foreign country, just a visa. One needs a passport to get back into their home country... And it makes no sense to require a passport to enter Ecuador, unless they are somehow different... I guess he's off to Cuba.

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supervon2Jun. 30, 13 3:40 PM

I see the waffle twins at the White House are busy doing damage control world wide now. They don't appear so lily white now, do they?

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greatxJun. 30, 13 3:42 PM

formergop says: "I hope the traitor finds the Russian airport comfy."

A traitor? Hardly. I guess you don't mind that YOUR government is tracking your every move and keeping ALL your email msgs for eternity...

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chavistaJun. 30, 13 5:09 PM

hobie2 Jun. 30, 13 12:31 PM "Odd comment.. up until a few hours ago, one doesn't need a passport to enter a foreign country, just a visa." *** Must disagree with you. Whenever I travel to foreign countries I must have a passport to board an airplane and I must show my passport when I enter the foreign country. Most, but not all countries do not require a visa from American citizens unless they are staying more than 90 days. The United States is far stricter than most other countries, and requires a visa for citizens of many foreign countries to enter. The United States has cancelled Snowden's passport, therefore he cannot board an airplane in Russia without a new or reissued passport.

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dahutysJun. 30, 13 5:25 PM

The more I hear about this guy, the more I think his real motivation was to bask in adulation from the rabid anti-government crowd, and he didn't really plan anything beyond telling everyone his name to get attention. Did he honestly think he could pass through Russian territory and all Putin would do was wave at him as he went by? If he's "under the care" of Russian authorities, they'll extract every scrap of classified info from him and his computer. They may grant him asylum but it's only because that gets Putin cheap brownie points with Russian voters who hate the US; as soon as Snowden is no longer useful for propaganda, he'll be tossed aside like used kleenex. And I know several people who are angry about the surveillance but still call him a traitor because he's run straight into the arms of America's enemies with sensitive data.

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nomedsJun. 30, 13 5:27 PM

A patent attorney in Sioux Falls would always send a picture of himself through email attachments to females. I wonder if the Gov't has kept those emails.

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JP55901Jun. 30, 13 6:28 PM

The government is not listening to everybody's phone calls and reading everybody's emails. They are tracking patterns. If a person is emailing/texting/chatting with people in say, Afghanistan or Iraq, it's probably good to know that information. The government is NOT reading posts on this website or personal emails to family and friends. And another tidbit of information for you republican posters... warrantless wiretapping and email tracking was started by Bush! Did you mind it then?

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wiseoracleJun. 30, 13 7:00 PM

Q. Regardless of whether you agree with his actions or not... from a US gov point of view... wouldn't we be better off if the guy was in Ecuador? I mean, worst case... someone pumps him or his p.c. for info; which is the lesser of two evils? I'd think we'd be better off letting him get to Ecuador.. as opposed to just staying in Russia? Which country would be able to capitalize on any info he has - to greater effect? I'd say heck... buy him a ticket to Ecuador, just for damage control reasons alone. Not sure i understand the theatre that is playing out here?

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