Minnesota corpsman: Struggling to come to terms with war's horrors

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  • Updated: June 28, 2013 - 5:12 PM

An enemy in our midst?

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hobie2Jun. 28, 1311:39 PM

"Let he who is without sin cast the first stone."

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pumiceJun. 29, 13 7:10 AM

From the article: "[W]ar dehumanizes people — the victims and the victimizers." Read the "Rash Report" on the Twin Cities' creative ecology for a cooper-perspective: The arts humanize people — spectators and artists alike.

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myob_STJun. 29, 13 2:12 PM

Two thoughts: first, I've never quite understood the prohibition against killing women and children in war. It's a war, and the purpose is to defeat the 'enemy,' to make that state or society do or stop doing whatever comprises your goal. If killing and maiming male non-combatants is allowable, why not women and children? Just wondering how that evolved - and how it changes now that women fight alongside men. Is it that war is supposed to be limited to the defined combatants? If I was willing to commit an act of violence, it would need to be for some extreme reason - so, why would any group be off limits? Is it somehow more human, or more courteous, or more thoughtful to only kill men? Serious question. I don't get it. Second - I understand that a soldier may be ordered to do things that s/he would normally find abhorrent, but that soldier may be punished by death if disobedient. I can therefore forgive the lower-level soldiers for atrocities to a certain degree. But leaders? No. If a person was in a position to give an order to commit an atrocity, then that person owns it, no matter the situation and no matter how long ago it was. If Karkoc gave those orders, 94 years old or not, nice neighbor or not, he should be shipped back overseas for trial and punishment.

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pumiceJun. 29, 13 2:40 PM

Re: "I've never quite understood the prohibition against killing women and children in war." If there ever was a prohibition against killing women and children in war, I don't know when the prohibition was ever honored. Killing non-combatants, whether the elderly or children or women, is and always has been part of war.

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