Al-Qaida, other militants said to be changing procedures to avoid surveillance after NSA leaks

  • Article by: KIMBERLY DOZIER , AP Intelligence Writer
  • Updated: June 26, 2013 - 4:20 PM

WASHINGTON — U.S. intelligence agencies are scrambling to salvage their surveillance of al-Qaida and other terrorists who are working frantically to change how they communicate after a National Security Agency contractor leaked details of two NSA spying programs. It's an electronic game of cat-and-mouse that could have deadly consequences if a plot is missed or a terrorist operative manages to drop out of sight.

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sooofedupJun. 26, 13 4:54 PM

Yup giving away all our secrets always makes so much sense. And those citizens demanding to be informed, and the media insisting on reports everything only makes us weaker. I'm not saying our government shouldn't answer to the public, but I don't want to be able to read about it's operations in a "spys for dummies" book. Actually, I'd like to, but don't want it available to those trying to kill us.

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heckyousayJun. 26, 13 5:13 PM

Thank you Edward Snowden for putting everyone in the world in more danger by giving away details of U.S. surveilance programs. You really showed the government, huh?

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theagonybhoJun. 26, 13 5:14 PM

If you think Al Qaida has been babbling on about terror strikes on Verizon and Sprint or AT&T your crazy, they use the untraceable throw away phones, good grief even the TV bad guys know that.

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swmnguyJun. 26, 13 5:19 PM

What a pathetic propaganda spin piece this is. The AP, along with the rest of America's corporate media, is the mere stenographer for the surveillance state. We saw it with the Occupy coverage, we saw it with coverage of the rush to war in Iraq and Afghanistan; we see it with the like of David Gregory proclaiming it is not his job to determine the truth.

So, if the NSA has actually caught any terrorists who were using Skype, they haven't made much mention of it. For good reason. It's been common knowledge for years that Skype is monitored. I don't care, but if I did, I wouldn't use it. Same goes for all the other "secrets" mentioned in this piece. If you "Google" (also well-known to be monitored) any of these surveillance methods, they're all well-discussed long before Snowden's revelations.

As the article foolishly mentions, bin Laden stopped using cell phones long before Snowden came forward.

When I read propaganda this clumsy, I wonder whether the authoritarians are stupid, or if they just think Americans are stupid. It may not matter which they believe, I understand. But it's a little insulting they'd try to peddle such weak lies that are so easily refuted with a Google search. And it's depressing that the AP and the STrib would just reprint such contemptuous nonsense.

And speaking of Al Quaeda, why are we bothering to spy on them? We're giving them weapons and training in Turkey and Jordan to fight in Syria. That's been well-known for months, if not over a year. It was in all the papers just last week, when President Obama said it out loud. If the AP and the intelligence apparatus think we're so stupid we didn't see that in the papers last week, why do they bother foisting this nonsense on us in the papers this week?

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heckyousayJun. 26, 13 5:42 PM

re: "they use the untraceable throw away phones" Duh. Who said anything about AT&T or Sprint? those "untraceable throw away phones" can be monitored. Anything put into electrons can be, it just gets more complicated. Thus the complexity of the eavesdropping programs.

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boozlesJun. 26, 13 6:03 PM

This article is pure propaganda. Nice attempt at changing the publics perception on the NSA spying on us all. While I disagree with Edward Snowden's method of whistle blowing, I do acknowledge him for letting us all know what our government has been doing with without our knowledge.

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bluedevil101Jun. 26, 13 6:18 PM

As Tim Robbins said several years ago: "There is a cold chill blowing through this country." How true, put on steroids by President Barack Obama.

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edinawaterJun. 26, 13 6:21 PM

I can choose to believe this story had at least seven anonymous sources, all of whom violated the same law Snowden is accused of violating, or I can believe this story is a complete fabrication. Occam's razor is only pointing one way here.

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edinawaterJun. 26, 13 7:18 PM

The article credits several anonymous sources for leaking this information to the press. I predict the government will not bother to investigate who those sources were. Ask yourself why.

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uknowthagodJun. 26, 13 8:14 PM

So we are supposed to believe that U.S. intelligence has been monitoring these members of Al-Qaida before and after the leak, and has observed a change in the way the communicate. If they have been monitoring them for so long, why not go after them?? Pure propaganda this article, and we aren't buying it. And swmnguy said it brilliantly. Why monitor them? They apparently are no longer our enemy as we are arming them and training them to fight against the Syrian government. Our eyes are open. You're not fooling us.

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