Student achievement: A proven approach

  • Article by: Harlan S. Hansen
  • Updated: June 25, 2013 - 7:27 PM

How the school day is scheduled can make a world of difference.

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pumiceJun. 25, 13 8:51 PM

From the article: "Schools can offer suggestions to those dealing with pre-K issues — home environment, parenting skills, early education programs, health issues, cultural differences — but they must be initially addressed by other agencies within the community." One item on your list, Mr. Hansen, has a proven track record for dealing with the other items on your list. Quality early education programs are designed to address home environment, parenting skills, health issues and cultural differences. All while increasing the likelihood that the young students will be prepared to learn literacy, language and number skills.

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tandabussJun. 25, 13 9:06 PM

Wow. Telling that the majority of public school teachers rejected a successful model, and their views dominated the actual results. And you wonder why I oppose Education MN and all their inculcation of status quo entitlement among their members....

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braxozJun. 26, 13 1:06 AM

tandabuss Jun. 25, 13 9:06 PM Wow. Telling that the majority of public school teachers rejected a successful model, and their views dominated the actual results. And you wonder why I oppose Education MN and all their inculcation of status quo entitlement among their members...._________ From the article: "The schools reverted to the old model because some noninvolved teachers felt it set up negative comparisons and because the principals, who supported the program, let the entire staff make the final decision." The failure was not at the teacher level, some teachers were already onboard - it is up to the principal to bring the rest along. That's their job, they are supposed to run the school, not the teachers.

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comment229Jun. 26, 13 5:06 AM

Now, which of the five failed politically mandated educational models (that I can name) would you be referring to? And after NCLB is deemed a failure, next year, a new one will be put in place. Sorry, but you can listen to the reasons "why" their is an achievement gap and it has always existed, and probably always will exist. I hate to use the expression "when I was in school" but it is true; there were kids and families that didn't give a dam about education then, and there are many more of them now. Teachers can only do so much, and over the years the problem has gotten worse. Case in point: I watched an Andy Griffith episode yesterday, where Helen (teacher) used a ruler to slap the hand of a student who was misbehaving. Today, she would have been fired for that. But the real problem is not our schools; it is our society. I could write a book about that, but I suspect you already know what about the problems that exist in our society and just keep right on growing out of control.

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jdlellis1Jun. 26, 13 7:37 AM

What is needed is replacing the agragrian based school calendar, in place for well over one-hundred years, with a year round calendar (e.g., 9 weeks on/3 weeks off). A year-round calendar would significantly reduce the re-engagement gap currently in place after students retrun from three months off. Tragically legislators continuously demonstrate the inability to think outside traditional norms and only insist on more programs and money. By the way, the successes of a year round calendar is not theoritical. Districts in the U.S. which have implemented clearly demonstrate improvements.

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gandalf48Jun. 26, 13 8:56 AM

braxoz - [From the article: "The schools reverted to the old model because some noninvolved teachers felt it set up negative comparisons and because the principals, who supported the program, let the entire staff make the final decision." The failure was not at the teacher level, some teachers were already onboard - it is up to the principal to bring the rest along. That's their job, they are supposed to run the school, not the teachers.] *** Sure, and then the teachers union would create a lawsuit accusing the principal of acting too much like a dictator and forcing a new program onto teachers who "didn't get a voice" in implementing the program. The principal is out of luck either way; allowing teachers to choose the programs they get to teach won't work because they fear change. Overriding the teachers and implementing a new education plan would mean dealing with a lawsuit and angry teachers...which would probably have the same result in the end but most likely the principal would have been removed due to the "controversy".

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daisy14Jun. 26, 13 9:50 AM

gandalf48, I am not sure how many school districts you have taught in, but over my years of teaching in three different districts, if admin said this is what we're doing, the teachers did it. I've never seen the teachers ever having a choice when admin has some new initiative.

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naseth12Jun. 26, 1310:08 AM

gandalf48 - *sigh* Your constant bias against teachers is old; they would do no such thing. Some teachers would complain, certainly, but they wouldn't sue. It is the administration's job to lead--something far too few of them actually do--and most teachers would find the change refreshing, particularly if said administration could show the data supporting such a change.

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gandalf48Jun. 26, 1310:38 AM

daisy14 - [gandalf48, I am not sure how many school districts you have taught in, but over my years of teaching in three different districts, if admin said this is what we're doing, the teachers did it. I've never seen the teachers ever having a choice when admin has some new initiative.] *** The Anoka-Hennepin district had to vote on allowing merit based bonuses for teachers. The union set up a crazy criteria of needing 75% of teachers to vote yes on that issue (non-voters were counted as no's) and the proposition ended up with 50%+ voted yes but did not meet the insane criteria the union set up. The administration was not allowed to bypass the union in that situation and school board could only put it up for a vote and was not allowed to say "this is what we're doing" and just do it.

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gandalf48Jun. 26, 1310:58 AM

daisy14 - [gandalf48, I am not sure how many school districts you have taught in, but over my years of teaching in three different districts, if admin said this is what we're doing, the teachers did it. I've never seen the teachers ever having a choice when admin has some new initiative.] *** The Anoka-Hennepin district had to vote on allowing merit based bonuses for teachers. The union set up a crazy criteria of needing 75% of teachers to vote yes on that issue (non-voters were counted as no's) and the proposition ended up with 50%+ voted yes but did not meet the insane criteria the union set up. The administration was not allowed to bypass the union in that situation and school board could only put it up for a vote and was not allowed to say "this is what we're doing" and just do it.

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