Minnesota education: It's progress to say it's not just racism

  • Article by: Mitch Pearlstein
  • Updated: June 25, 2013 - 7:34 PM

And it is indeed good to accept complexity. Might that include, from the left, flexibility on education, or a stronger recognition of the role of family structure?

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pumiceJun. 25, 13 7:46 PM

From the article: "[A] heavy influx of low-income and poorly educated people (on the one hand) with one of the smallest middle-class minority communities of any major metropolitan area in the country (on the other hand) has had an enormous amount to do with the overall poor performance." Is this another way of saying that it's economics which underlies the achievement gap in education, Mr. Pearlstein?

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pumiceJun. 25, 13 8:33 PM

Given that economics underlies the achievement gap, Mr. Pearlstein, I have a couple of follow-up questions: (1) Do you deny the efficacy of quality pre-K programs? (2) What should the legislature have debated and passed instead of allocating money for Head Start, money for pre-K scholarships and money for all-day kindergarten? (3) Which is the school's responsibility: educating the children who come through the schoolhouse doors or making sure that as few children as possible come into this world outside of marriage? (4) Why should TFA have a blanket variance? There's a provision for individuals to get a variance based on individual qualifications. (5) Vouchers? At an amount high enough so that the poorest, most disadvantaged children can have places in small, elite, non-unionized private schools???

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kamkamJun. 25, 13 8:44 PM

And there it is buried toward the end...another false statement about Education Minnesota kicking Teach for America out of Minnesota.

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jimjimjimjimJun. 25, 13 9:24 PM

"Is this another way of saying that it's economics which underlies the achievement gap in education, Mr. Pearlstein?"

As usual, liberals ignore the real reason these folks are struggling - the lack of a male role model in the house.

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davehougJun. 25, 1310:21 PM

that as long as graduating high school on time is essentially a 50/50 proposition for African-Americans and Hispanics, not just in Minnesota but across much of the country, the kinds of changes routinely championed on the left just won’t cut it - - - that plus the vast majority of births to minorities outside of marriage = not blame the victim, but facts to be acknowledged before progress can be made. I know of nothing more certain to create poverty than a baby to an unmarried high-school dropout. - - responses respectfully read at davehoug@comcast.net

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schristeJun. 26, 13 6:46 AM

jimjimjimjim - but I thought that was not the purview of the State. Which way is it, social engineering or no social engineering, or just the GOP social engineering. And Davehoug, with the GOP drive to outlaw birth control, I don't think that your fact will change any time soon.

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dewarfJun. 26, 13 9:49 AM

84% start out destined for poverty, welfare, poor education, drugs, crime and incarceration. Especially the male babies of this 84%. And the liberals STILL want to ignore it and rather throw more money at Head Start, teachers unions, police and prisons. Are they slow learners? Oviously! We've now had nearly 50 years of Hubert Humphrey's "War on Poverty". How's that working, liberals? We've created a monster in our inner-cities and our public inner-city schools. We spend $2.5B in Hennepin Country alone to pay for Humphrey's 'Great Society'. And meanwhile, another generation of blacks are on that slippery slope with 84% starting out at a distinct disadvantage. Only 50% will graduate from High School, with a much higher percentage of black males dropping out. These males then impregnate the next generation and the cycle continues (in fact, gets progressively (no pun intended) worse). When will they ever learn?

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cstoney48Jun. 26, 1310:51 AM

dewarf said: "Humphrey's 'Great Society' - and his "War on Poverty". Actually, it was Johnson's "War on Poverty" and "Great Society" and those programs did reduce the number living in poverty in the US from 22.1 percent in 1959 to 13.7 percent in 1969. The 1980s saw the Reagan "the government is your enemy" revolution and the programs which helped millions were gutted--with a smile. They have never been restored. I would never defend "urban street culture" for it is corrosive and destructive of those who are in it. It consumes families, neighborhoods and whole urban areas. But there are many more Anglo poor Americans than African-Americans. And all of their numbers are increasing. The reasons are complex and far beyond the crass "we nurture and tolerate the poor too much." That is mean spirited, shallow and just plain wrong.

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braxozJun. 26, 13 6:34 PM

dewarf Jun. 26, 13 9:49 AM 84% start out destined for poverty, welfare, poor education, drugs, crime and incarceration. Especially the male babies of this 84%. And the liberals STILL want to ignore it and rather throw more money at Head Start, teachers unions, police and prisons. Are they slow learners? Oviously! We've now had nearly 50 years of Hubert Humphrey's "War on Poverty". How's that working, liberals? We've created a monster in our inner-cities and our public inner-city schools. We spend $2.5B in Hennepin Country alone to pay for Humphrey's 'Great Society'. And meanwhile, another generation of blacks are on that slippery slope with 84% starting out at a distinct disadvantage. Only 50% will graduate from High School, with a much higher percentage of black males dropping out. These males then impregnate the next generation and the cycle continues (in fact, gets progressively (no pun intended) worse). When will they ever learn?____________ You've outlined your understanding of the problem, what is your solution?

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jarlmnJun. 26, 13 6:51 PM

"The dissimilarities between Minnesota and the Old South would seem pretty self-evident," in that the ancestors of many Minnesotans bravely fought the Confederacy to free the slaves. Now, their decedents watch aghast as blacks are instead kept-down and beholding in the Liberal's "Great Society" plantation. What progress...

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