Summer solstice: Let's make it matter

  • Article by: Alex Beam , Boston Globe
  • Updated: June 20, 2013 - 9:13 PM

We don't really celebrate this, the longest light of the year, but we should.

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myob_STJun. 20, 13 9:00 PM

To the Christians, happy St. John's Day. To the pagans, happy Midsummer's Day. To the majority of us, happy longest day of the year - get out and enjoy it.

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pumiceJun. 20, 13 9:39 PM

Re: "To the majority of us, happy longest day of the year - get out and enjoy it." 'Cuz the sun will rise later and set earlier the next day and the next and the next.... Cursed be the cloudy spring!

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PrivateJun. 21, 1312:46 AM

" The purported birthday of John the Baptist occurs on June 24, but who remembers that? " Actually it's none other than those "dour" Norwegians who celebrate St. John's Eve every June 23 with picnics, paganistic communal bonfires and sailing in the fjords. No, not a paid holiday, but neither are Halloween or Valentine's Day.

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northguy7Jun. 21, 13 3:18 AM

In the meantime, let us celebrate and rejoice in the changing of the seasons. No religion is necessary, that's why we love living in Minnesota.

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firefight41Jun. 21, 13 7:19 AM

I don't celebrate the summer solstice’s wintry counterpart

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bluebird227Jun. 21, 13 8:14 AM

I DO celebrate the winter solstice. Ridiculous, I know, but I like to think of it as the first unofficial day of spring since we're headed in that direction. A little mind game to get through the long winter.

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Mike1eyeJun. 21, 13 9:55 AM

Tripe. Rabbit pellets. Why celebrate the inevitable occasion of the longest day on a planet rotating on a tilted axis? To assign extraordinary meaning to such an ordinary occurrence is like making National Talk Like A Pirate Day (September 19th, in case you don't know) a serious federal holiday. It's arbitrary, man, and as much worth celebrating as the day the cicadas emerge from their 17-year hibernation (which was earlier this summer). Did you celebrate that, huh?

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football24Jun. 21, 1312:06 PM

Great cosmic paradox is this, the first day of summer: True; longest daylight; eve of many months of fine weather. With all the outdoor graces to pleasure the peoples of the northern hemisphere. But also true: The eve of the beginning of the shortening of daylight; the coming cold, the beckoning winter months. Marvelous universe we inhabit, is it not?

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gandalf48Jun. 21, 13 1:55 PM

I just want another day off from work...yeah let's make it a holiday!

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januarygirlJun. 21, 13 1:58 PM

Hey, Mike1eye. Are you one of those "dour Norwegians"? I don't think the author was "assigning extraordinary meaning to such an ordinary occurrence" but just recommending we all add a little more celebrating and enjoyment to life, which can seem overly serious and challenging sometimes. More daylight is a good enough excuse for me to celebrate!

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