Report: Teacher training programs not selective enough, do not prepare educators for classroom

  • Article by: PHILIP ELLIOTT , Associated Press
  • Updated: June 18, 2013 - 3:38 PM

WASHINGTON — The nation's teacher-training programs do not adequately prepare would-be educators for the classroom, even as they produce almost triple the number of graduates needed, according to a survey of more than 1,000 programs released Tuesday.

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kerber12Jun. 18, 1312:19 AM

Adequately preparing educators? That's not the real problem. Let's focus on the weak curriculum and the "everybody gets a passing grade" and "everyone wins a medal" nonsense. The high achievers should get rewarded and the low achievers need to be told to study harder. Period. No further discussion.

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ianstantonJun. 18, 13 3:51 PM

The hard part is telling to to the parents and the students that they are low achievers and both need to work harder.

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sausageJun. 18, 13 3:57 PM

The good teachers are not allowed to teach. Subject matter is watered down. Classroom standards and discipline are left to "a student idea of democracy and fad". Yesterday's fad is tomorrow's standard--and soon becomes the out dated method. There will never be an effective teaching that does not involve a direct relationship between a teacher who desires to teach and a student who knows what is demanded from him/her. Unfortunately there is one factor that must be destroyed before we can attain good education again. Teacher tenure must be abolished.

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minneg56Jun. 18, 13 4:17 PM

Adequately prepared PARENTS send adequately prepared STUDENTS to school. As for adequately prepared teachers? In what other profession do you have to be a nurse, nutritionist, psychologist, social worker and parent figure to your client BEFORE you actually start working with them? The absence of adequate parenting is the issue - not inadequate teachers.

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MongooseBJun. 18, 13 4:26 PM

So who is The National Council on Teacher Quality? Never heard of them, and this doesn't exactly paint a clear picture.

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waterdogzJun. 18, 13 4:29 PM

"When asked how much experience they have, the most common answer from teachers is one year. First-year teachers reach around 1.5 million students." Well no duh. :-) How could the top answer NOT be one year? It's just common sense. Every teacher at some point answers one year. And as some teachers leave the profession each year, lower numbers will have greater levels of experience. The only way it could change would be with a massive demographic shift that upends society. Next they will tell us that we always find things in the last place we look.

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tnchaskaJun. 18, 13 4:49 PM

Just another fine example of how Union led and Union run organizations work. Is anyone truly surprised?

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wplettfanJun. 18, 13 5:15 PM

The National Council on Teacher Quality - "a research and policy group working to ensure that every child has an effective teacher." (Google it) So, if they find that teachers are adequately prepared then they have just taken away their reason for existing, and therefore their paycheck. No wonder they find that teacher candidates are lacking.

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comment229Jun. 18, 13 5:25 PM

minneg56: PERFECT ANSWER... now, how do we get some think tank experts, and politicians to realize this? And to the comment saying we need to get low achievers to study more... nope, wrong, we need to get them to STUDY period! We also need to get rid of the statement that says we need to get students to do their homework... also wrong... WE NEED TO GET THEM TO DO THEIR HOMEWORK WELL! and further, by themselves instead of copying a "friend's" homework. And finally, to the cheap shot about unions and tenure, would you please read what tenure is? It has been discussed here for years, and yet some people do not understand that it does NOT protect poor teachers! It can be summed up in two words... due process... and that is all it does..... time for YOU to do your homework!

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la0tsuJun. 18, 13 5:27 PM

Tougher standards may be necessary, but to think that tougher standards alone will be sufficient to attract the highest quality teachers is naive beyond belief. Given the long hours, difficult parents, undisciplined students, and low pay compared to other similarly credentialed professions, it's no surprise that the best and brightest have little interest in teaching.

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