Minority groups in Minnesota grow faster than the national average

  • Article by: Mary Jane Smetanka , Star Tribune
  • Updated: June 13, 2013 - 12:00 AM

Groups are growing faster in Minnesota than nationally, but the state is still less diverse than most other states, the newly released numbers said.

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dentesterJun. 12, 13 9:25 PM

Won't it be nice when the day comes when we no longer think (or write) about people based on their race?

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chemnpJun. 13, 1312:47 AM

My guess is that races are probably growing at the same rate, but the way we count minorities makes it seem like white people are not reproducing. Specifically, if white people are having families with minorities, their children will be considered minorities instead of 1/2 white. This is because in American culture, the minute you have a drop of non-white blood in you, you're considered completely "non-white." This isn't to say that it's some insidious scheme to rile up races to battle each other, but it is a flawed counting methodology.

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Garet43Jun. 13, 13 4:57 AM

dentester. Your answer lies in the comments above. So long as xenophobes continue to obsess about the pigmentation levels of the most recent arrivals to our country, we will need to smack them down. Minnesota is my state too, and I am sick of looking at the comments section of the ST and feeling ashamed. Minnesotans are better than this!

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jsmithxcJun. 13, 13 5:27 AM

Maybe we should build an immigration policy based on the year 1492. Lets face it if your not Native American, and I am not, you are a newcomer, an immigrant. Get over it the world changes. People are people no matter the color of their skin or ethnicity.

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odinmanJun. 13, 13 7:27 AM

@jsmithxc - Even Native Americans can be considered immigrants...having crossed the Bearing Strait from Asia thousands of years ago. What I don't like about this "everyone is an immigrant" argument is that it does not take into account any given point in time. Just because my great grandparents arrived in the U.S. from Scandinavia over 100 years ago does not mean that I myself am an immigrant. The correct definition is that if you were born or were a citizen of a different country than where you currently reside, then you are an immigrant.

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jrock612Jun. 13, 1310:42 AM

Funny, my taxes have grown faster than the national average also. Let's be honest here folks. Whenever I'm out grocery shopping, minority groups are always armed with EBT/WIC cards while I'm paying cash for food.

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EleanoreJun. 13, 1310:59 AM

"So long as xenophobes continue to obsess about the pigmentation levels of the most recent arrivals to our country, we will need to smack them down." - The xenophobes are the true minority in the group dentester points out as the problem. The majority of that group are people of all ethnic heritages, all skin colors, who assign pigmentation a quality of merit (for anything but medical issues like sickle cell) then use that assignation to profit financially, politically, or otherwise. Those are today’s problem racists because they don't bigot based on belief, but on profit

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wesley173Jun. 13, 1311:14 AM

Chenmp: Your answer lies in the comments above. So long as xenophobes continue to obsess about the pigmentation levels of the most recent arrivals to our country, we will need to smack them down. Minnesota is my state too, and I am sick of looking at the comments section of the ST and feeling ashamed. Minnesotans are better than this!

Your comment is absurd. Nobody cares about pigmentation of skin. What people care about is the rule of law.

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herby2013Jun. 13, 1311:16 AM

Gosh, I'll bet Minnesota's generous welfare programs have nothing to do with it, right? You have to be a resident of the state of Minnesota for a grand total of 3 days before you qualify for Hennepin County cash assistance. Yes, 3 days.

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efrik1Jun. 13, 1311:56 AM

herby2013, welfare for the sake of welfare is wrong. Ben Franklin said it best: "I am for doing good for the poor, but I differ in opinion of the means. I think the best way of doing good for the poor, is not making them easy in poverty, but leading or driving them out of it. In my youth I traveled much, and I observed in different countries, that the more public provisions were made for the poor the less they provided for themselves, and of course, became poorer. And on the contrary, the less was done for them, the more they did for themselves, and became richer."

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