Given the significant needs of many disabled students, should the state allow teachers without proper licenses to teach them?

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  • Updated: June 9, 2013 - 8:16 AM

Given the significant needs of many disabled students, should the state allow teachers without proper licenses to teach them? Please post your comment below.

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toooomuchJun. 9, 1310:11 AM

You are leaving out a very important issue around special ed students. The special education teachers usually see a student for part of the day, but most of their day is spent in a regular classroom. The regular classroom has many general ed students and as I had this year eight special education students, two who were autistic students. The disruptions to learning in the classroom were significant. It would be important for that information to be reported because much learning time is lost and no one is advocating or making laws for the general ed students who are losing much when it comes to their education. As teachers we are being asked to manage classrooms and get scores to rise, but more and more they are just putting more and more students with special needs in the classroom that cannot manage in that setting. In the regular classroom we are also getting spit on, sworn at, not listened to, hit, arms broken, chairs thrown, etc as are the students who are in the classroom. EBD labels are rare these days, they just instead leave the students in the regular ed classrooms and tell the teachers to deal with it. Who is speaking for and protecting the rights of the regular educaiton students. I have read every one of your articles and never once have you mentioned or reported on how those students are effected by this issue.

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duchy418Jun. 9, 1311:20 AM

As a society we have allowed our children to be unaccountable and need to have an excuse or label to justify poor behavior and parenting. It will not get better until parents start parenting. Children need to be held, hugged and talked too from the first day of life and told NO when they start to do things that are dangerous or unsafe. Many of our children in America are left alone or put in overcrowed day cares and do not recieve the bonding needed to become a well rounded person. Chilren need to be the number 1 priority for parents. If not we will continue to see a rise in Austism and other behaviors. By creating labels for these kids we have taken the responisbility from the parents. Very sad what is happening in America. I don't want to go to work tomorrow. Can we create a syndrome for that and call it, "Day off Syndrome" my employer would need to come up with a plan for this by the federal and state government and complete 25 pages of paperwork allowing me to miss work.

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spicebearJun. 9, 13 2:08 PM

Although there is a shortage of SPED teachers, there is no shortage of unemployed licensed teachers. A significat barrier is the cost/debt required to re-train. Teachers who fail to find permanent work seldom can afford more loans to re-train for another license. Solution: State funded re-training for licensed teachers who want to re-train for SPED.

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rangesonJul. 21, 13 8:04 AM

Rangeson's wife here: I am going to be brutally honest, at least in my own opinion and personal experience: I work every day as a paraprofessional in a mid-size MN school, though I am within just a few years of retirement. I work every day with kids with various "labels" on their IEPs. In my personal experience, let me tell you what I have seen happen over my near 30 years of experience as a para. PARENTS ARE FAILING. SOCIETY IS FAILING. GOVERNMENT IS FAILING. How? Government is failing, by putting the emphasis on test scores for funding and "success". Society is failing by allowing any discussion about education/schools/teachers to become a forum for public hatred against teachers and schools, it's always about the cost, and failing to hold parents accountable for their choices. We are no longer capable of being a single-job supported economy for our families, and I know that it is not politically correct to say that, but I'm sorry, it's true. While I certainly understand why moms need to work, as I have always had to work myself, society is failing because it's no longer a choice, but a necessity. Kids are in day-care too long, and while some are great and very nurturing, many are not. Daycare employees and headstart and preschool employees are terrified to discipline out of control kids in ANY way, for fear of facing a backlash themselves for "hurting" little Johnny, even though little Johnny just stabbed little Suzy with a Lincoln log, because little Johnny's parents think their darling is a little angel, and they believe in "talking to Johnny" rather than a time-out! Bad behavior is already ingrained by the time they hit elementary school, and the teachers are now supposed to "handle" the problem? We need more mental health care in this country, but so many of these kids are not really mentally ill, they are just broken. Broken because of poverty, lack of parenting skills, and being used as chess pieces by political parties. Gianni in today's article: Mom says one thing that jumps out at me: He's "suffering" because the school took away one thing "calms" him: his video games. School is NOT for video games, it's for learning. If a kid can't learn for some reason, and he's preventing others from learning and being safe, he shouldn't be in school. Period. The solution has to be something else, period.

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rangesonJul. 21, 13 8:16 AM

A better question: Why are EDUCATION professionals being asked to do the job of MENTAL HEALTH PROFESSIONALS? Why? It is a teachers job to educate, NOT treat a child with mental health issues. It should not be a school's concern in any way. If the kid can't make it through a school day with a minimum of intervention, they should NOT be there. Otherwise, you are making the majority of kids who can, suffer.

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rangesonJul. 21, 1311:02 AM

My son, a senior studying Education, just read these articles. His question? Is this just another ploy to get Teach for America people into these positions? Without their licenses? Here's what he thinks: What exactly are "teachers without proper licenses?" What does that even mean? Solution: We need to pay specially trained teachers a lot more money to deal with special kids. But I imagine that will be seen as just more "greedy teachers". And he'd be right.....that is what a lot of people would say. I bet it would be more expensive to pay mental health professionals in a treatment center, than teachers in schools, so this situation comes down to money, again.

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tgtownNov. 19, 13 1:08 PM

I have a son who has been in the Orono school system beginning preschool at age 3 He has disabilities due to many health issues before and after birth We have been blessed with many awesome teachers and case managers who have kept his progress going.I feel he is delayed in his learning but can progress and has been.In 11th grd his case manager had retired and replaced quite possibly by a teacher who seems to have no clue about special education it was a year he was set back The teacher was replaced in his 12th year with a qualified teacher and started progress again.This year he started a transition program where his 11th grade teacher was moved to Now after all his hard work to get this far In a critical phase in his life due to a teacher who has no idea about disabilities or how to teach special ed he and other students in the group are very stressed and frustrated setting back their progress more.If these students do not receive proper education they will be forced to stay on social sec disability longer or forever because they were held back by unqualified teachers.So if they save money on teachers they need to allow more money to be available for disability payments to these kids for a lifetime.And with cost of living going up it will cost the system way more than just hiring the right people for the job to begin with!!!!

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tgtownNov. 19, 13 1:10 PM

I have a son who has been in the Orono school system beginning preschool at age 3 He has disabilities due to many health issues before and after birth We have been blessed with many awesome teachers and case managers who have kept his progress going.I feel he is delayed in his learning but can progress and has been.In 11th grd his case manager had retired and replaced quite possibly by a teacher who seems to have no clue about special education it was a year he was set back The teacher was replaced in his 12th year with a qualified teacher and started progress again.This year he started a transition program where his 11th grade teacher was moved to Now after all his hard work to get this far In a critical phase in his life due to a teacher who has no idea about disabilities or how to teach special ed he and other students in the group are very stressed and frustrated setting back their progress more.If these students do not receive proper education they will be forced to stay on social sec disability longer or forever because they were held back by unqualified teachers.So if they save money on teachers they need to allow more money to be available for disability payments to these kids for a lifetime.And with cost of living going up it will cost the system way more than just hiring the right people for the job to begin with!!!!

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