Catholic nuns put faith before church hierarchy

  • Article by: REKHA BASU , Des Moines Register
  • Updated: May 21, 2013 - 11:30 AM

Deliberately defying orders, breaking laws and challenging the government doesn't fit the old stereotype of habit-wearing religious women deferential to authority.

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thoroughbred21May. 21, 1312:04 PM

Go nuns!

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KepmeisterMay. 21, 1312:17 PM

What utter nonsense. More poorly disguised Catholic bashing. By defying the Pope - remember it was Jesus who appointed a Pope to lead the church - they are denying their faith. Nice try by the writer. I'm sure she'll be able to come up with another biased story very soon.

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wearend4May. 21, 1312:38 PM

Firstly, they are not returning to their roots, as they put it. They are radically different from the original foundation of nuns within the Church. It is alright to disagree with the Church hierarchy on some petty issues, but when they openly flout even basic Church doctrine and Church officials, they are removing themselves from the very unity of the Church. These particular nuns are not heroes--they are heretics. Nuns who became saints (e.g. St. Catherine of Siena) did so because they were so perfectly united with the will of God, who gave power to His Church to govern on earth. And by so openly defying the bishops, they are thus defying God, who has ordained those bishops within the Church. Also, the habit is a truly beautiful sign of a religious' vocation, so "shedding" it is not praiseworthy. That is why they have forgotten their call, because they no longer have anything to remind them of what their call is. Their outward sign of their God-given vocation has been traded for some false sense of piety. They have traded Charity for power. Pope Benedict's encyclical Deus Caritas Est (God is Love) greatly expounds on what true Charity is; but since they have given up Charity, they have thus willingly given up God.

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Tygyr13May. 21, 13 1:08 PM

Jesus appointed Peter to 'start' the church, not a Pope. Peter was not a Pope, he was a disciple, albeit a main one. My question is, When did "Pope" come into the church, and it's not in the Bible. How does it get tied in? Basic question, I know, but I am fuzzy on it. Thanks for any enlightenment.

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merrytrareMay. 21, 13 1:14 PM

Jesus did not appoint a pope. You need to check your church history. Jesus did not give a damn about church hierarchies. HE WAS A REBEL!! He would be driving the nuns on the bus. You go, nuns!!

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bannedmuggsMay. 21, 13 1:20 PM

The interesting part of the article is that the Church supports 99% of the issues the writer mentions in the article. The problems arise when "Catholic" nuns support contraception and abortion. That's not Catholic. Most of the Catholics I know and I should say, we actually practice the Catholic faith, not just what we want, hope the Vatican does a better cracking down on these nuns as well as "Catholic" colleges and universities that don't want to completely follow Catholicism. Enough is enough. If you want to use the title, practice the Faith. If you can't practice the Faith, the Vatican and archdioceses need to cut funding and let them go on their own.

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firefight41May. 21, 13 1:39 PM

Jesus did not give a damn about church hierarchies. HE WAS A REBEL!! He would be driving the nuns on the bus. ************* No, Jesus would not be doing that.

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merrytrareMay. 21, 13 1:49 PM

firefight41, How do you know? Do you really think that Jesus was all about obeying the wrong laws and rules?

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wearend4May. 21, 13 2:09 PM

Yes, Jesus did appoint Peter as the pope, in order that the Church could be goverened after Christ had left. Very clear in Mt 16. Also, we Christians ought not be living sola scriptura--it is very dangerous to say, "Well, the Bible didn't say anything about it, so it must not be bad, or must not exist." The Catholic Church has both Scripture and Tradition at its disposal. There are many things that were not recorded in the Bible, but happened and were written about elsewhere. Yes, Christ is the Good Shepherd, but he also needs someone to physically tend his flock while he is not here. And merrytrare, Christ would most certainly NOT be driving said bus. He was not as much of a rebel as you would suppose. Rebels seek to overthrow and create new laws, but he came to fulfill the law, not abolish it. Many of his words and deeds were countercultural, but what he did was to fulfill the laws previously given. These woman are counter to the will of God. I'll do a quick logical analysis of these nuns, which ought to appeal even to the sola scriptura crowd: The Bible, the inspired word of God, states in 1 John 4:8, "Whoever is without love [Caritas] does not know God, for God is love [Caritas]." These supposed nuns openly deny charity (another translation for Caritas) as an integral part of their mission and part of their work--"as one put it, 'that charity wasn’t enough,'" . Thus, they deny God himself, who is true Charity itself.

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cvalcitMay. 21, 13 2:20 PM

I was taught by nuns who still had their tattoos from the german concentration camps. They were hardened women who didn't put up with nonsense. They were leaders of the 1960's peace movement and they would have approved of the nuns of today. They understood when the Vatican "through open the doors" and went back to the teachings of Jesus.

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