Minneapolis motorcycle death leaves many questions

  • Article by: LIZ BOSMAN
  • Updated: May 20, 2013 - 9:17 PM

It is a tragedy any time someone dies or is killed, and it is the living who have to deal with the consequences. I believe that a person has the right to chose and weigh the consequences of their choices.

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jhb8426May. 20, 13 9:46 PM

Maybe one question that needs to be answered is when is Mpls. going to get over it's anti-3M product bias and invest in the traffic light changers they make. Every city and suburb around here has them. Why not Mpls.?

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luxaeternaMay. 20, 13 9:59 PM

The tragic death of the motorcyclist certainly does raise questions about emergency vehicles going through a red light. If their light is red, someone else has a green light, and that person may have no idea that a emergency vehicle is about to enter the intersection. Running a red light is an incredibly dangerous and potentially fatal action. In St Paul, where I live, the emergency vehicles are equipped with strobe lights that activate a traffic signal sensor that gives them a green light. Was such a system in operation in the case of this tragedy?

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firefight41May. 21, 13 7:30 AM

Why were the police racing to a scene that had already been secured? Did the police slow down enough to assess the roads before going through the red light? ****************** According to reports, the police slowed to about 15 MPH, had their lights and sirens going. If this is the case, the person on the motorcycle made a fatal mistake. The damage to the police car rear corner panel indicates that is what happened. No questions here.

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northhillMay. 21, 13 8:32 AM

Anyone who rides a motorcycle or bicycle or drives a car or other vehicle faces the chance they may be killed or injured while doing so. In December of 1978 I was driving southbound in Nicollet Avenue in Burnsville.It was snowing and cold; I had both my heater and radio on and my 4 year old child in the backseat. As I approached Burnsville Parkway I had a green light.Eastbound on Burnsville Parkway was a Burnsville police officer responding to an emergency with his siren on; the cop was coming up a hill toward Nicollet. With my heater on it was virtually impossible to hear the siren. Fortunatly for all concerned I was able to see his emergency lights just as he was about to enter the intersection and was able to stop. I consider myself fortunate. I was very lucky that day, so was the Burnsville cop and so was my child.

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jer029May. 21, 13 9:19 AM

Not many questions really - as a retired police officer I can foresee the outcome. It's pretty simple really - Emergency vehicles against a red light (with lights and siren on) can "request" right of way - but are not ensured it. It's against the law not to yield to emergency vehicles. So - the motorcycle victim's family will collect damages from Mpls. (the taxpayers of course), the officer involved will likely be emotionally damaged - and might have a difficult time returning to duty. Yes...Mpls needs to invest in the traffic light control system that is almost standard everywhere else. This incident - and the harrowing shooting and chase that precipitated it, plus the shooting of the college student held hostage gives ordinary citizens the life and death split second decisions that police officers make on a regular basis - you generally only hear of the ones that go bad. Keep this in mind when you lump your emergency workers into the 'greedy public employee' category - you want to pay them less, take away their pensions - send them back to work serving slurpies at the 7-11 (since they're special area of training prepared them for little else than minimum wage security jobs). The alternative is to have them train for a parallel career so they can migrate into something when they can no longer handle the rigors of the job. This means less time training to be the best officer they can be - and less capable of making these types of decisions. Be careful what you wish for. You don't expect your favorite football player to be on the field until 55 or older, do you really think it's a good idea for your police and fire personnel. My sympathy to the family of the motorcyclist (I also ride), and to the officer who will carry this the rest of their life.

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jgmanciniMay. 21, 1310:29 AM

From the article: "We can stop much faster than a car, so don’t follow so close."-----I have lived in 6 states and have driven in most of the lower 48. My observation is that Minnesota drivers are possibly the worst tailgaters in the nation. It's concerning when you're in a car, and absolutely terrifying when you're on a motorcycle. Is getting to your destination a couple of seconds sooner really worth someone's life? Please back off.

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westroad18May. 21, 1311:03 AM

" According to reports, the police slowed to about 15 MPH, had their lights and sirens going" .... What police report are YOU reading??

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luxaeternaMay. 21, 1311:31 AM

15 mph is about 22 ft/second, or the equivalent of a sprint. At that speed, a car would cross an intersection in a couple of seconds. Maybe it slowed down, but it was still going faster than many drivers or motorcyclists could react and come to a safe stop.

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sporty007May. 21, 1311:50 AM

Intersections are inheritantly one of the most dangerous places for motorcycles. In this case if the officer would have looked twice he just might have saved a life. My thoughts and prayers to the friends and family of this young man.

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firefight41May. 21, 1312:09 PM

In this case if the officer would have looked twice he just might have saved a life. ***************** How do you know he didn't look twice? How fast was the motorcycle going? Had to be higher than the speed limit to kill the person.

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