Labor force still shows scars from Great Recession

  • Article by: KEVIN G. HALL , McClatchy News Service
  • Updated: May 11, 2013 - 5:33 PM

Despite improving conditions, one out of five American families reported that no one in the household had a job in 2012.

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wabbitoidMay. 11, 13 7:50 PM

The use of the term "Great Recession" as a euphemism is especially amusing in this article which accurately depicts how dire the job market it. Why is it that the word "Depression" cannot be spoken? Afraid that the truth will cause a panic? And why is there no corresponding fear that our inability to understand the economic situation for what it really is - indeed, roughly the fifth Depression in US history - will make it impossible for the population and our leaders to understand the urgency of the situation? Yet here we have one more article on how there is no normal post-recession "recovery" hopelessly tied to the same tired language. Can we please stop? This is indeed a Depression. If the subject of this article can't convince us of that, we will never properly diagnose and certainly never cure this disease.

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omitfactsMay. 11, 13 7:56 PM

Improving conditions? 17 million unemployed Americans. Labor participation rate at Carter levels. Fewer jobs now than when your dear great one took office. How much longer are you going to attempt to prop this loser up? It really makes you sound foolish, and you have near zero credibility remaining.

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billiebob345May. 12, 1310:44 AM

'Most of the improvement that we’ve seen in the unemployment rate hasn’t been due to increased job opportunities. It’s been due to people dropping out of, or never entering, the labor market because of weak opportunities,” said Heidi Shierholz, a labor economist for the Economic Policy Institute, a liberal think tank. There are several aberrations present in today’s labor market. For one thing, the fact that the unemployment rate has fallen 2 percentage points since June 2009 omits the darker fact that it’s a share of a workforce of 155 million that’s smaller than it was at the start of the recession. If people who have dropped out of the workforce were included, the jobless rate would be higher. “The fact is that we’re 2.6 million jobs short of where we were at the start of the recession. And that doesn’t even count five years of population growth,” said Chad Stone, chief economist for the Center for Budget and Policy Priorities, a center-left think tank. Interesting that both of the comments about higher unemployment than is actually reported by the folks in DC is from left leaning think tanks. These are not republicans bashing the democrats. Some one in DC needs to wake up and smell the coffee.

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theagonybhoMay. 13, 13 1:07 PM

Great recession? That's an Obama term, the real great recession had 25% unemployment and there were blocks long lines for soup. Obamas recovery is like his presidency, transparent. Every thursday i wait to see how many people filed for unemployment, its now my guage to see how many have quit looking for work .

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ciamanMay. 14, 13 1:56 PM

Our economy is in the swamp and it has been there for five years and the future is nothing except for broken mirrors. Most people gave up years ago and lost all hope of ever finding a new job. The young people, even ones with the college degree, cannot find any decent job. The true unemployment numbers are 14 percent! But no one will tell us the truth. Soon enough, no one will be able to buy cars or homes again. Or at least remember that so many people are at retirement age and will have even less income. Are we in a Depression? Yes, that is what I would say.

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