Minnesota waters need clearer regulation

  • Article by: John P. Lenczewski
  • Updated: May 9, 2013 - 9:59 PM

Regulatory authority is a mishmash. This matters currently with sand mining.

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elmore1May. 10, 13 7:23 AM

This is a prime example of the redundancy in our state agencies that are charged with managing our precious water resources. Disappointing that Dayton (supposedly an environmental supporter) and the DFL majority refuse to reform, cut or redirect any existing state spending. They just want to tax and spend more on everything without improving existing programs...

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sawmanMay. 10, 13 6:01 PM

Laws may help, but you won't stop the money. Water resources are very valuable and it is downright ignorant not to protect them for the good of all.

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Willy53May. 11, 13 5:29 AM

elmore1, I get it, if we cut the budgets of agencies that regulate and protect our waterways we'll be better off? The real problem is the patchwork quilt of stormwater reuglating agencies that cover our state. Some our county agencies (Ramsey County Watershed District), or management agencies, (McKusick Lake Water Management District) or watershed districts, (Brown's Creek Watershed District). I believe all of these agencies function off of county budgets and have wildly different powers and impacts on water projects in their district boundaries. They do have the potential to wield power but most are developer friendly, seing their job as adding a few environmental friendly storm water controls to keep the developer from simply destrtoying entire watersheds. This menagery of organizations does not have a state mandated set of controls and are for some reason not very effective at actually achieving improved water quality. After the Brown's Creeik Diversion was completed, a nine million dollar project to dump dirty watershed flowage into McKusick Lake to clean up Brown's Creek for Trout reproduction, the board immediately approved a one hundred unit housing development on the shores of Brown's Creek. Figure that one out. The mad a retention pond of McKusick Lake with suburban runnoff diverted from another watershed and then gave that watershed a real death blow with a huge housing development. Tragic. These watershed entities are no match for frac sand mining.

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glennbslmplsMay. 11, 13 9:54 AM

John Lenczewski is spot on. At base, one of the key functions of state government is to steward the natural resources we possess for current and future generations. Frac sand mining represents an imminent threat to the springs, streams, and cold water resources found in SE Minnesota. These are enjoyed by all visitors to this beautiful portion of our state, by trout anglers, and local residents. Unfortunately, local governments have not shown the ability to provide consistent regulation of frac sand mining interests and now the State of Minnesota must exercise its role as steward of these cold water resources for the good of all Minnesotans today and for future generations. I urge Governor Dayton to stand behind his DNR Commissioner and institute the necessary protections for the cold, clean water of the trout streams of SE Minnesota.

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