Late, lower-than-feared Red River crest at Fargo puts spotlight on forecasting

  • Article by: BILL McAULIFFE , Star Tribune
  • Updated: May 5, 2013 - 11:01 PM

Fargo spent $3 million on flood that never came.

  • 6
  • Comments

  • Results per page:
  • 1 - 6 of 6
stearns1985May. 6, 13 6:26 AM

When I heard these predictions recently, I was baffled! Granted, I live in St. Cloud, but have friends in the Fargo area, and our long winter weather was similar. And I am not a weather/geological scientist, but .... wouldn't a little educated common sense figure in here?? 1st: The ground last fall was VERY dry, limiting a deep, solid freeze. 2nd: We had an early, heavy snow cover insulating the dry soil before the hard freeze temps arrived. 3rd: a full month ago we had a slow melt followed by a few days of fast melting (greatly reducing the snow pack), at which time much of the ground frost left, allowing the water to absord into the dry soil rather than runoff! Granted we had 2 major snowfalls after that point, but very limited ground frost, high sun, and dry ground quick absorbtion and limited runoff! This is all rather predictable, even along the "unpredictable" north-flowing Red River area. Were many ground frost samples NOT taken along the Red River Valley???

4
9
earneditMay. 6, 13 7:13 AM

stearns, had North dakota experienced a big melt in early April, it would have been a different story. The article says that, in a roundabout way. The better question to ask is why Fargo isn't more aggressive about moving more structures out of the way, like Moorhead has done. Instead they focus on massive mobilizations with sandbags and levees, while asking for 1.5 Billion plus from the taxpayers for a diversion that floods areas downstream.

11
1
swmnguyMay. 6, 13 7:45 AM

Who exactly is behind "criticism in Fargo that the city spent more time and money — about $3 million altogether — than necessary to protect against the high water?"

Seeing as Fargo seems to get hit with "100-year floods" every other year or so, I'd hope anyone pointing fingers doesn't own any property in the floodplain.

I have to wonder if these are the same people who balk at the price of sensible flood diversion measures, yet clamor for help when their feet get wet every other year.

There are always those who want the eat their cake, and have it too; those who want all the assistance but don't want to pay for it; and those who point fingers at others when their own judgment is clearly suspect. By this time, nobody in that region should be able to buy insurance that covers against flood-related damage, and their insurance should cover the costs of sandbagging etc. It seems like a 50-50 chance of catastrophic flooding every year, which makes it a cost not worth insuring against.

7
1
beautyehMay. 6, 13 9:42 AM

They call it a flood plain for good reason.......

1
0
wach0031May. 6, 1310:59 AM

I was sitting on my couch one day about a month ago and just thought, "I bet it won't flood." Nailed it.

1
0
davehougMay. 6, 13 5:56 PM

Why does a sandbag have to be destroyed after 2 years???? Isn't the shelf life sitting on a pallet higher than that??? What ruins a sandbag?

0
0
  • 1 - 6 of 6

Comment on this story   |  

ADVERTISEMENT

Connect with twitterConnect with facebookConnect with Google+Connect with PinterestConnect with PinterestConnect with RssfeedConnect with email newsletters

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

question of the day

Poll: Can the Wild rally to win its playoff series against Colorado?

Weekly Question

ADVERTISEMENT