High-risk health providers stay in business thanks to state insurance

  • Article by: Brandon Stahl , Star Tribune
  • Updated: May 6, 2013 - 6:16 PM

A state-created “insurer of last resort” provides coverage for doctors, others who can't get conventional insurance.

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rayk1800May. 4, 1311:01 PM

Great article. Medicine seems to a protected class with restricted information not made available to the public. Interesting how doctors can move to another state and practice. I would love to know where the doctors got their training and the school. Hospitals probably look closely at the background and record before letting them practice in the hospital.

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fwallenMay. 5, 13 7:00 AM

There are solid reasons they can't get insurance, because the have a history of being a bad risk. Why should the state reward mediocrity or worse incompetence?

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jbpaperMay. 5, 13 7:15 AM

"The MJUA board no longer makes decisions on whether to cover individual practitioners, said chairman Rolf Halstensen, a board member since 2009. He said he assumes staff makes those determinations. Asked if the organization enables bad doctors to keep practicing, Halstensen replied: “I don’t know.”" ----- The chairman of the board "assumes" staff is making the determinations and doesn't know if it enables bad doctors to continue practicing. I think the first order of business is to get a new chairman. It appears that we have an incompetent board running a program that makes decisions about incompetent doctors, not a good combination.

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avejoeconMay. 5, 13 8:30 AM

Malpractice is the main reason our medical costs are so high. Have a negative outcome, It must be the doctor's fault, so I'm suing the Doctor, the Hospital, his clinic, his nurse, the owner of the building his office is in, The maker of med that was giving to me that allowed me the extra 10 minutes needed to get to the hospital,etc etc, etc. When Texas passed tort reform, Lawsuits went down by 70%. THat is what this country needs. The doctors now do every test that can think of, just to avoid malpractice lawsuit!

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kallman11May. 5, 1311:17 AM

Another fine example of your tax dollars at work.

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jpcooperMay. 5, 1311:18 AM

avejoecon "Malpractice is the main reason our medical costs are so high. Have a negative outcome, It must be the doctor's fault, so I'm suing the Doctor, the Hospital, his clinic, his nurse, the owner of the building his office is in,"

Now you can include the State of Mn as the "Insurer of Last Resort"

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lakesloverMay. 5, 1311:46 AM

What the country/state needs is also a way to find out about incompetent lawyers!! That's a group that protects themselves! It isn't until they swindle you out of money for retaining them and they start working on your case that you find out they are EXTREMLY incompetent and they've already robbed you of your money! Can any lawyer respond to this and inform the public on how we can check on their background! Tort reform must happen in this country. But guess what, it won't happen with our politicians because 95%+ practice law when they aren't "serving" us in public office and they don't want anyone to get in the way of raping people or corporations out of money! And you wonder why these self-serving politicians and lawyers get their bad reputation! They come by it dishonestly!!

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ziggymMay. 5, 1312:15 PM

“What would be my concern is: if [physicians] were practicing without insurance, what recourse would the consumers have that were injured by them?” Johnson Piper said." Good point. Doctors can still practice unless their licenses are revoked by the Medical Board. If they practice with insurance and harm someone, the consumer can get money. If they practice without insurance and harm someone, the consumer is left floundering. I think the Medical Board issuing licenses need not to just "discipline" bad docs but actually revoke their license to practice.

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duckofdeathMay. 5, 1312:50 PM

What's the issue here? If incompetent or negligent doctors can't buy the insurance they need to practice, then we just lose a good portion of our available doctors. Or they continue to practice uninsured, get sued, declare bankruptcy, and move on to the next gig. Its certainly better for patients to have some financial recourse available.

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kkjerMay. 5, 1312:56 PM

According to the Federal HHS 100,000 people a year die because of medical malpractice in hospitals. About 16,000 are children. To put it perspective that is like 4 Jumbo Jets a week crashing and killing everyone aboard.

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