Bee die-off is linked to many causes

  • Article by: Josephine Marcotty , Star Tribune
  • Updated: May 3, 2013 - 6:27 AM

But researchers stop short of proposing pesticide bans.

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teddygMay. 2, 1310:48 PM

Having seen how the EU is far ahead of the US on pesticide and crop protection science and regulation, I'll believe the Euros before the American (as much as it pains me). In the US, our regulators look the other way and let industry do the research, which almost never includes any long term studies.

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tonyrozyckiMay. 2, 1311:52 PM

Bees are essential to our food crops!

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thedanmanMay. 3, 1312:54 AM

Perceived risk and lawsuits is why everything you buy in this country is more expensive than it should be. I'm satisfied to give it time for researchers to study control groups to try find a root cause and not just a media or activist driven 'link'. No doubt about it, bees are extremely important. The key issue is getting it right and not speculation which usually causes further damage.

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cricketedMay. 3, 13 1:33 AM

The E.P.A . is way under staffed ! Some people wanted smaller government and they got it.We have a smaller F.D.A too that's why it takes so long for our drugs to get approved O.S.H.A is the next target ! Meanwhile our military is bigger than the next 25 combined (24 of them are our allies) Our government is so weak right now that if we try to prosecute a large corporation or even a medium sized one it loses because it gets out lawyered. For a country to be strong it needs a strong central government .

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jcinmnMay. 3, 13 5:39 AM

"In a telephone news conference, they said that bees are threatened by many complicated hazards and that the costs of a pesticide ban might exceed the benefits. They called for more research on the role of agricultural chemicals, and, in the meantime, further steps to protect bees and other pollinators." How long are they going to drag their feet? Until the honey bee is extinct in North America? One solution is to house hives in metro areas and do annual census. Compare crashed hives in rural areas and metro areas.

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nessmessMay. 3, 13 5:42 AM

This is very concerning, several key crops are dependent upon the bee's to pollinate. They had better figure out how to reduce the impact of those particular pesticides and how to combat the parasites (ASAP!!!!)

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bearcatbbMay. 3, 13 6:58 AM

Too bad there isn't any good companies that would voluntarily take that pesticide off the market. Too much greed again is the problem.

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nomedsMay. 3, 13 7:28 AM

They say that pesticides are necessary to keep food prices down. Cheap food prices may be the problem. Just look around. Eating less spells better health and less healthcare costs.

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nessmessMay. 3, 13 7:49 AM

They could also consider growing different crops (where there are large bee populations), the pesticide's (used with new crops) could have much less impact (or none at all). I sounds like there are numerous things causing the shortage of bee's. I agree, we NEED to get more people involved in starting hives (in cities, rural ranches, etc....). I am trying to convince my brother-In law to start bee hives on his farm (where he mostly grazes cattle). I am even considering it... I have a large nature preserve backing my property...

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NoMasBSMay. 3, 13 8:19 AM

I have my little two and a half acres and let a lot of it grow wild with wild flowers of course so hopefully I'm doing my part to help. I know FOR SURE that the Hornets are loving me..

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