Minnesota liberals and Obama's labor secretary nominee

  • Article by: Jason Lewis
  • Updated: April 27, 2013 - 6:46 PM

Let me tell you about a case that involves big names, a St. Paul court case, and an apparent bit of quid pro quo.

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pumiceApr. 27, 13 7:45 PM

Quick! Contact Oliver Stone about this convoluted conspiracy theory, Mr. Lewis.

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kallman11Apr. 27, 13 7:55 PM

Hard to believe the "party of the people" would abuse it's authority to skew result in favor of it's liberal agenda... NOT. Happening EVERY DAY lately.

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bootsy07Apr. 27, 1311:55 PM

"Disparate impact" is a hideous concoction and the machinations by Perez and our beloved politicians to prevent the Supreme Court from ruling on it is disgusting.

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greg62Apr. 28, 13 3:59 AM

This tells us a lot about the modern day democrat party. Thanks for exposing this Jason!, news like this is usually covered up by the mainstream media.

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Willy53Apr. 28, 13 7:31 AM

Thanks for connecting all those dots, Jason. It's like unfolding a difficult piece of origami. Reading this unbiased, piece of investigative journalism renews my faith in the media. No longer can they say that big corporate, rich, liberal media moguls like Murdoch and the Koch brothers threaten the freedom of the press. And what a great piece of irony you've found and at the same time can rile sentiment against minorities and attempts to create fair housing. I mean, the Strib has really shown its Pulitzer colors and commitment to excellence with this quality commentary.

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grumpy42Apr. 28, 13 8:38 AM

pumice- There is no conspiracy here, these are the facts. Let me ask you to defend your conspiracy theory in light of the FACTS being presented. It is clear that your beloved Progressive party was stealing from the public by misspending $200,000,000 dollars. They mispent these funds to further their extreme left agenda to buy votes. That is a fact, the reason it was dropped and then covered up is the question that begs to be answered.

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jo1glexApr. 28, 1311:35 AM

Seems pretty nefarious. Looks like we have a situation where an assistant Attorney General is involved in legal action pursuant to policy and ever-evolving policy-related legal doctrine. Who knows where this could lead?

Next week I hope Mr. Lewis can find a case in which a politician does something for political reasons. Or a cat who seems to have it in for mice and birds.

Like it or not, public Attorneys are political figures. That's prosecutors, Attorneys General, etc. They all are; every single one. The legal system is how laws and policies are interpreted and executed. Policies are inherently political; hence the derivation of the term. And, while we're stating the obvious, birds of a feather flock together. So it rather stands to reason that all these people are working together on the same policy-driven cases. It's what they do. It's their job.

Now if you don't like the politics of the policy, go ahead and say so and state your objections. Merely assuming we all know that all races are equally affected by everything all the time is a false premise to begin with, and misses the entire point of the policy issue here. Which, come to think of it, is the hallmark of a Jason Lewis piece.

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jweb1958Apr. 28, 13 2:13 PM

A valuable commentary, but a newspaper committed to non-partisan reporting would have carried this story many months ago. Because the facts of the story don't advance the Strib's left-wing narrative, the story is just ignored. The news media has for decades had a pronounced liberal slant, as serious liberal historians have frequently admitted (Robert Dallek, Stephen Ambrose, et al). But the slant can no longer be attibuted to inevitable bias resulting from journalists' overwhelmingly liberal sentiments. As with the Philadelphia abortion doctor story, when a story runs counter to the preferred media narrative, the story is just buried for partisan reasons. The worst aspect of "disparate impact" is its effect on higher education. Employers, since the Briggs case, no longer use aptitude tests of any type, because black and Hispanic applicants would do very poorly due to their much inferior educational achievements

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HenryElWafiApr. 28, 13 7:36 PM

No matter what your opinion or political leanings, Walter Mondale has earned the title of Honorable or Former Vice President.

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