Cassidy Turley space appeals to millennials

  • Article by: Janet Moore , Star Tribune
  • Updated: April 22, 2013 - 9:37 PM

Minneapolis real estate firm Cassidy Turley embraced the ideas of its millennial employees in rethinking its office work space.

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handsomepeteApr. 23, 13 3:43 AM

This is an improvement? Putting employees in open areas with so many distractions around, people moving about, etc., is not good for productivity. You cannot concentrate in that type of environment. High wall cubicles are better if any kind of thinking is required in the job. Then you can focus on your work without seeing things moving about all day long in your peripheral vision. Furthermore, I cannot believe that any business is requiring employees to wear ties and dress shirts and dress pants to work in an office in this day in age. Why would it matter how people dress if they are not meeting with clients? Looking at the picture, it seems one of the employees may be cheating a little by wearing casual pants like Dockers or something.

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hridgewoodApr. 23, 13 6:16 AM

Who, pray tell, occupy the three private offices? Aren't they worried about not being in the "middle of the action"? Millenials will be considerably more interested in the trappings of power when the mass of baby boomers above them retire -- or die -- and the youngsters can realistically aspire to senior positions.

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edinawaterApr. 23, 13 7:21 AM

I know two businesses that tried low cubical walls, then did an about-face and switched back to high walls. Low walls led to constant distractions. People would come to work sick and then everyone else would get sick. Even in this economy good candidates were turning down job offers, citing the open space as a reason. I think these young millennials are a little short on wisdom.

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SammyBoyApr. 23, 13 8:08 AM

Three comments before the first insult to an entire generation based on one article. Well done, edinawater.

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mattaudioApr. 23, 13 9:00 AM

Maybe millennials concentrate differently than others. I concentrate when there's a buzz around me, and when things get too quiet I am much more prone to distraction. This is the 21st century... distractions are not people or things outside one's cube, distractions are on computer screens inside your own cube. Good for this company for providing their employees with a better location at the same cost.

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CarrieMplsApr. 23, 13 9:07 AM

Where are the introverts supposed to work? You can't tell me all millennials love this scenario. Seriously, the constant audio and visual distraction would drive me batty.

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cyberpunkApr. 23, 1312:10 PM

As far as these types of environments go, this one appears very well done. The trend with most employers is to just pack people into smaller desks in smaller spaces and not give much thought to things like sound masking. Speaking of which, it works great for overall room noise but if someone is sitting 6’ away from you and talking in your direction when there is no partition between – the sound masking doesn’t help much. The key sentence in this whole article doesn’t come until near the end: “Collaborative workspaces also save money, because less space is used, Fisher said.” Key phrases being: save money, less space. Often, less is not better it’s just less.

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dbalestriApr. 23, 1312:38 PM

Awesome collaboration! Every single person in the picture has their back turned to everyone else.

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readingrobApr. 24, 13 8:31 AM

Goodness. Every negative comment above sounds like it came from the grumpy old man everyone had in their neighborhood growing up who always yelled at you to turn that rap music down, pull up your pants and get off his lawn. Does it occur to anyone that millennials concentrate differently than older generations? Why are Starbucks always crowded with young people studying or reading? Why are new college libraries built with more group work space rooms? Read just one article on changing work habits in this new generation and you'll find your answer. And edinawater are you really saying that if low partitions were simply raised 18" it would stop the transfer of airborne illness? I think you're the one a little short on wisdom.

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periusApr. 24, 13 2:31 PM

I’m wondering if there is any research to support changing a company’s work space: Do companies with an open workspace see higher retention rates after making the change or compared to their competitors? Do they see more hires from referrals after converting? Do they see higher revenues? What, besides a general consensus that millennials prefer this kind of work environment, are companies using to decide how their workspace should be configured?

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