Student loans add stress to young marriages

  • Article by: Kevyn Burger , Special to the Star Tribune
  • Updated: April 16, 2013 - 9:14 AM

Marrying into debt can test the marriages of young college graduates, especially if that debt is higher for one partner.

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mdachsApr. 16, 1312:17 AM

And the problem is???? If 2/3rds of college graduates leave with an average of $30,000 in student loans, let's put that into perspective. The prices of many new cars now are between $20,000 and $30,000 - in general, auto loans are between 36 to 60 months. Usually, if I am correct, I believe that most student loans have at least a 5 year payoff period, if not more. Some have an interest only payment option for the first few years. If college graduates, when they are planning to get married, cannot deal with this question before they get married, then maybe they should not get married, until they agree on how to manage the loan repayments. When I graduated from college in the 1970's, it took me 7 years to pay off my student loans. I didn't get married, but I also didn't complain about repaying the money I borrowed. I also worked 2 jobs while I was in college to offset my expenses. And I didn't buy a house until 10 years after I graduated - and paid off my loans. I am growing very weary of the current crop of college graduates' whining and complaining! Their parents spent way too much time spoiling them and not teaching them to take responsibility for their decisions and actions.

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nessmessApr. 16, 13 6:30 AM

Simple solution: Don't take out such large loans, minimize total loan by working your way through college and don't get married at such a young age...

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gopherfoshoApr. 16, 13 7:55 AM

Same old arguments: when I graduated 30 years ago I only needed xxxx amount of loans or you need to work through college so you don't have to borrow as much. Have any of you bothered to check how much tuition has gone up in the last 15 years? Glad it was easier in your day but today's graduates are facing conditions that have never been seen before. Simply put, college is incredibly expensive and it's basically a requirement in today's economy. We have no other choice.

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jd55604Apr. 16, 13 9:19 AM

If your parents are willing to cash out their 401Ks to fund your college then you have it made. If you have to pay for it yourself then prepare to spend the next 20 years paying off your loans. I know some of you are under the illusion that tuition is still $10/semester but times have changed. A full time student is not going to be able to pay off room, board and tuition working part time delivering pizzas. Unlike 30 years ago; tuition rates are astronomically high now and recent college grads aren't automatically vaulted into the middle class immediately after graduation. Many are unable to work in their fields of study and subsist on menial jobs for years after obtaining a degree. Compare the stark contrast in unemployment numbers for 20 somethings to people in their 50s. This is not the same job market I experienced when left college years ago.

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beebee82Apr. 16, 1310:00 AM

mdachs, 1. I don't see too many recent grads driving $20,000 cars. 2. That seven-year repayment on those loans you took out in the 70s!!! is about 14 years shy of how long it takes today's grads to pay off their loans. 3. Waiting until you're 28-

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djmdmnptApr. 16, 1310:21 AM

I understand lack of maturity is a major aspect in the high divorce rate, but I think it has to be noted a college degree isn't worth what it used to be. I graduated two years ago from the U with a bachelor's degree in communications. Since graduating, I've been working at a job that required my degree, and am still only making $12 an hour (which is after a $2 raise). If I had worked this full-time job during college, I would barely have covered tuition and rent, and my grades certainly would have suffered. I would have been better off not going to college and working as a manager at McDonald's. If an entire generation has to choose between education or financial security, where will the country be in the long run?

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nessmessApr. 16, 1310:21 AM

excuses, excuses, excuses....... But pleanty of solutions.... I just take good planning and patience... 1) you can start saving for college before you go 2)A) you can go to a two year school the first year or two and spend less than $4,000/yr on tuition -or B) you can get a technical degree in two years (check out the average salaries, they are pretty good, 3) transfer to University and complete last two years (you could live off campus, at home, etc -vs- spending $10,000 on Room/Board. Another suggestion.... Don't take 5-6 years to complete a degree, do it in 3-4 years.... Plus, you don't need to go to a private school and waste $50-60,000/year on a liberal arts degree (in community organizing, women's studies, etc....)

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bgronniApr. 16, 1311:38 AM

I do not see any stress from my kids on college loans. it all comes from me. I have 65K to pay off on college loans for my 2 kids. Yes they graduated. but cannot find work that pays them enough to live and then make the loan payments. was it a waste for them to go to school? time will tell i guess. in the mean-time. the college loan money is coming directly out of my retirement savings. I AM STRESSED!

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songczarApr. 16, 1312:21 PM

Pro tip: Don't marry young.

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ezekial2517Apr. 16, 1312:29 PM

I have no doubt that my $20,000 in student debt was a contributing factor to my being "let go" in my last relationship. Some people just have super high standards, I guess. ;)

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