University of Minnesota's critics are wrong

  • Article by: LINDA COHEN
  • Updated: April 10, 2013 - 4:20 PM

Gov. Arne Carlson's claims of excessive compensation, administrative bloat and more were just all wrong.

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rolflindyApr. 9, 13 6:14 PM

This letter would have been more effective with a better explanation of the tasks accomplished by all those 6 figure administrators. She also didn't prove her assertion that Carlson's piece "contained inaccurate information, omissions and contradictory criticisms."

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alansonApr. 9, 13 6:16 PM

The bottom line is the University is increasingly unaffordable for the average student. There's no question about that. We can argue about whether this equates to "bloat" or not. But it's the job of the Board of Regents to ensure that the U provides a good college education that can be afforded by the average Minnesota student. Rather than quibbling with the ex-Governor about factoids, the Board needs to provide a strategy for maintaining the affordability of an education at the University. If the Board doesn't do that, or can't do that, then the members are not doing their job.

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pumiceApr. 9, 13 6:19 PM

Most telling statement from the article: "[F]or families earning adjusted gross incomes of $75,000 or less, the university’s Twin Cities campus has a lower net price (tuition, fees, room and board minus financial aid) than any other four-year college in the state — public or private." This despite "a $140 million reduction in annual state support to the university since 2008."

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pumiceApr. 9, 13 6:24 PM

Regarding rolflindy's contention that Ms. Cohen "didn't prove her assertion that Carlson's piece 'contained inaccurate information, omissions and contradictory criticisms.'" Re-read paragraphs 2 and 6 through 10. Pay particular attention to statements beginning with the words "also" and "moreover".

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jameswallaceApr. 9, 13 6:34 PM

Any institution that thinks it can spend $800,000 to NOT play a game is bloated.

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ti1310Apr. 9, 13 7:18 PM

Most telling statement from the article: "[F]or families earning adjusted gross incomes of $75,000 or less, the university’s Twin Cities campus has a lower net price (tuition, fees, room and board minus financial aid) than any other four-year college in the state — public or private." This despite "a $140 million reduction in annual state support to the university since 2008."---- And very misleading, financial aid formulas look at the assets of the parents, not just adjusted income. Second Cohen omits the fact that tuition has gone up far faster than inflation. third if benchmarking against UW Madison this statement would not hold true. for Cohen to make this statement is disingenuous at best.

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ti1310Apr. 9, 13 7:26 PM

----Regarding rolflindy's contention that Ms. Cohen "didn't prove her assertion that Carlson's piece 'contained inaccurate information, omissions and contradictory criticisms.'" Re-read paragraphs 2 and 6 through 10. Pay particular attention to statements beginning with the words "also" and "moreover".--- words don't make for proof pumice metrics do. Carlson supported his contentions in his op ed with metrics along with benchmarking to allow the reader to see the basis for his contentions, and cohen has not... rolflindy's statement is not a contention pumice, its a fact...

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justsaying79Apr. 9, 13 7:31 PM

ti1310: Tuition has indeed gone up faster than inflation. However, cost of attendance has NOT gone up. Cost of attendance is paid by tuition plus state support. As state support has gone done dramatically, the share of cost paid by the student (tuition) has gone up a lot, even as overall cost has not gone up.

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ti1310Apr. 9, 13 7:35 PM

---ti1310: Tuition has indeed gone up faster than inflation. However, cost of attendance has NOT gone up. Cost of attendance is paid by tuition plus state support. As state support has gone done dramatically, the share of cost paid by the student (tuition) has gone up a lot, even as overall cost has not gone up.--- Your contention is not true, total cost in real terms for undergraduate attendance at the U has gone up over the last 10 years..

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ti1310Apr. 9, 13 7:39 PM

The number of employees at the University of Minnesota with "human resources" or "personnel" in their job title—272—has increased by a third since the 2004-2005 academic year, a period during which the enrollment grew approximately 8%.

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