Minnesota should boost state aid to needy students

  • Article by: Star Tribune Editorial
  • Updated: April 6, 2013 - 12:20 PM

Lessen student debt loads, and Minnesotans will benefit.

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FrankLApr. 5, 13 8:42 PM

The relief should be targeted to what we need, we need primary care physicians and fewer specialists. We need engineers, instead of being oversupplied with dance majors. We have plenty of elementary ed and gym majors, but too few in math, science and special ed. Don't just throw the money out there, target it to where we get the best return.

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elmore1Apr. 5, 1310:26 PM

The colleges need to do their part by reducing costs in addition to moderate state funding. Still waiting to see Mr Kaler do something at the U.

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briechersApr. 5, 1311:12 PM

The ratio of ideas to subsidize the price of education must run 20 to 1 relative to the ideas for how to lower the cost of education. Where are the innovative ideas? Educators seem to have about as much incentive to lower the cost of education as lawyers have for tort reform. If the state increases funding for the university, a big part of it should be directed at identifying, developing and implementing cost reduction ideas. Every business that has year over year productivity goals has a pipeline of productivity programs to work from. Does the university have a pipeline of productivity programs? Is productivity a term they are even familiar with?

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comment229Apr. 6, 13 6:15 AM

No disrespect intended, but you will never see enough college students enroll to become teachers in the math and science field for two reasons. First, after graduation, they look at their career choices, and compare what they would make for a large corporation compared to an entry level job teaching while considering their amount of debt racked up in four years. Second, they have to pass the new state exams to teach math and science to be certified and they are written so most prospective teachers could never pass them. Remember, they are education majors, not math and science majors. Are they competent to teach those classes in schools? Sure are... but that is not what the tests correlate with, and who wrote the tests? So many of them, accept education jobs teaching "something else" and then the comments come about not enough math and science teachers. It reminds me of the nursing profession, where an article was written a few years ago about the shortage of teachers in colleges who prepare nurses. Why? Because the nurses that graduate, will make more money, than their teachers. I'm not saying to dumb down the tests, but at least take a look at them, and compare it to what needs to be taught in our public schools, and try to get the two on the same level. It is time for the state to create three levels of competency in the two curricula areas of concern and let the prospective teachers take the test that fits the needs: middle school, junior high, or senior high. Right now, those tests are written so college level instructors would struggle. I know several people who have questioned the state of MN on this one, and have come up empty. Sorry, but change is needed to get qualified teachers in these areas, and mayne it is time to determine what "qualified" is.....

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comment229Apr. 6, 13 6:19 AM

PS.... Times have changed. I put myself through college on a catch 22... My parents made too much money so I did not qualify for any financial help. And my parents told me that I needed to get a job. I worked full time while attending college as well. Free time? What's that.... This would be almost impossible to do today, considering the cost of college these days. So what's the answer? I don't know, but there is an awful lot of money going to colleges these days, and I suspect health insurance of college employees is astronomical. It would be interesting to see a breakdown of that, and also, an article about how many graduates, have not even attempted to pay back their loans.

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tuttifruttiApr. 6, 1312:01 PM

We are all needy. The government needs us to be needy so they can stay in control of us. Redistributing income is not the role of the federal government. I have enough of a challenge putting my own kids through school and you want me to pay for someone elses kid? Worse yet is that most kids going to college, regardless of economic need, are studying worthless subjects and getting worthless degrees.

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panktainterApr. 6, 1312:02 PM

So I am in my 50s, went to school by working, grants, scholarships and student loans. Took some time to pay off the loans and was not able to finish school in four years, but did it. Worked through entry level jobs and made a life for my kids. The kids went through the same process. My oldest grandchild is looking at the same prospect. Why are we now looking to pay their debt? If you can't afford college look at alternatives. Trades are paying better than liberal arts. Military service provides opportunities. You are not owed a college education. What is your attendance? Do you make an effort? Is your family life messed up? Many of these are out of your grasp. How do we fix that? More money? Where? The education system is more concerned with their salaries, benefits, and legacies than the benefit of the students. Look at the balance sheet, if you have access to detail, and you will find advanced education is a comfortable life, compared to students and parents paying for core curriculum vs distribution requirements. Teach the degree, get the elementary and secondary standards established and quit wasting taxpayer on college waste.

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thedanmanApr. 6, 13 3:14 PM

Definitely a solution looking for a problem. First off, most 18 year olds should not get grants. Waste. Of. Money. 2nd, as others have stated, bang for buck is important. Who wants to support arts & engrish majors that will have difficulty paying off their loans working at a coffee shop? 3rd. Solution, if there is a problem, should come from those working in academics, not by politicians. Finally, I'm paying plenty to give your kids an opportunity for education. I'm not willing to pay more. In summary: Get approved for a low interest student loan and go prove your mettle.

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greg62Apr. 7, 13 7:26 AM

I couldn't afford to send my daughter to the U of U, I'm sure not in favor of using my tax money to send illegal immigrants there.

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sallyjosApr. 7, 13 7:31 AM

Fund the schools, not the students. This voucher system of aid to individuals, rather than making the cost of public education inexpensive to everyone, is the consequence of a deliberate policy shift to a "high tuition, high financial aid" model that was supposed to have made public universities, colleges and tech schools "competitive." Not only is the price high, but giving the aid to the individual student has tinged education funding as "welfare." Let's start really reforming higher education, beginning with a return to free vo-tech programs.

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