Schafer: 'Lean In' book ignores Facebook's lockdown tradition

  • Article by: LEE SCHAFER , Star Tribune
  • Updated: March 30, 2013 - 11:45 PM

In Sheryl Sandberg’s much-discussed new book about moving more women into leadership roles, it’s disappointing that she writes nothing about a Facebook tradition called “lockdown.”

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honeybooMar. 31, 13 8:56 AM

Working for large companies is for the birds - even if you're at the top. Not sure why this is held up as some kind of ideal for anyone, regardless of gender, to pursue.

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SnippetMar. 31, 13 9:45 AM

Yet more evidence that whatever gap exists between men and women in the workplace is the result of not of discrimination, but of different priorities. When you chose not to take that assignment in San Francisco, you are indeed signaling a lower commitment to the company than the person who takes that assignment. You have made a little thing called a choice. You have chosen to prioritize your family. Choices have consequences. You get more of one thing, and less of another. More family time, less mulla, or vice versa.

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gleninthedenMar. 31, 13 4:19 PM

I have a hard time seeing as a social problem needing a national conversation the fact that any group is lagging behind another group in the race to having the most members classified as overpaid, paper pushing executives. My view here is sort of the opposite of my view on unions where people should think "maybe I can rise with the help of Unions to where I am as well paid as they currently are." But in the case of this article my thinking is that nobody should be paid, or given the credit for a corporations results or any subsequent knock-on effects for the country, what CEO's of large corporations are, regardless of gender. When looking at compensation in the business world, in general it seems like it is those that get paid the most are those that accomplish the least in terms of materially affecting the wealth of the nation. I mean, taking the example from the article, what exactly would have been accomplished in that hypothetical meeting in San Francisco other than a lot of jawboning? What is Zuckerberg and Facebook accomplishing in their lockdowns other than creating a better Rube Goldberg social networking device? -- All people want to do on FB is share what they're doing in comments and photos -- it's not complicated. The national conversation that is needed is not that we need to find ways to make sure the one percent that is enjoying an even greater share of the pie is more evenly divided between men and women. It's not as though the world is going to be a better place if there are more female Gordon Gekkos. The national conversation that is really needed is to figure out how the material wealth of this nation can be distributed in a fair and just manner that at the same time incentivises activities that further improves the material condition of the nation. And yes, if that system is really fair and just then by default there shouldn't be any discrimination based on gender, race or any other group. But insofar as the sort of gender discrimination described in the article and book exists, it exists because we are not living in a meritocracy but rather in the business world it is more of what I call an 'Office Politocracy' where the ability to navigate relationships within the office successfully is all that is incentivised in the business world. It sounds like the author of the book in question is merely suggesting more women 'lean in' and be more aggressive at marketing themselves as some confident figure that people could rely on as a strong leader. Never mind that they may be just as good as any man at steering the corporate ship into a reef -- at least they did it with confidence!

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SnippetMar. 31, 13 6:41 PM

>>> The national conversation that is really needed is to figure out how the material wealth of this nation can be distributed in a fair and just manner that at the same time incentivises activities that further improves the material condition of the nation. <<< Actually, we've had this conversation for at least 70 years. I'd like to see a national conversation along the lines of: "Let's leave people alone unless we have reason to believe they have broken clearly defined laws, whether they are rich or poor."

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