CEOs of American Airlines, US Airways tout merger, but consumer advocates fear higher fares

  • Article by: DAVID KOENIG , Associated Press
  • Updated: March 19, 2013 - 1:23 PM
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  • 1 - 8 of 8
njc264isbackMar. 19, 13 3:28 PM

Lol, if you need any evidence about potential job loss, look no further than what Delta just did to all the previous Minnesota-based Northwest workers: move to Atlanta or see-ya.

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njc264isbackMar. 19, 13 3:29 PM

Must be nice to be a CEO who runs a business so poorly that it sits in bankruptcy for multiple years, only to have a white knight (US Airways) come in and pay a nice little golden parachute to you. This deal stinks. Consumers and the rank & file employees get screwed on these mergers.

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eurotravelerMar. 19, 13 3:32 PM

This merger is not good news for the flying consumer, even if it is for those 2 airlines. Answers from the CEOs that prices would not go up for consumers are only true in a different universe than the one we live in.

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rafannonMar. 19, 13 4:28 PM

This is a union busting proposition also. Bankruptcy was a plan to bust the high paying jobs and have as little as possible... Ask Delta Employees... they need 2 jobs to support themselves

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swmnguyMar. 19, 13 4:40 PM

This is a dying industry, kept alive only by court-sanctioned abuse of the bankruptcy system, massive government subsidies, and blatant antitrust violations. The cost of fuel alone will kill domestic commercial air travel in the next 20 years, if not sooner. Business will have to adjust some of their habits. Big Business is already clamoring for high-speed rail. And we'll have to change our school and work calendars to accommodate the fact that a trip to Florida for Spring Break will take 24 hours in each direction rather than 6. Trans-oceanic travel will survive, but it will be a lot more expensive, and be fully government-subsidized. I wouldn't be surprised to see cruise lines bring back trans-oceanic cruises, at prices comparable to what intercontinental flights really cost. Of course, the cruise lines will have to figure out how to keep the toilets and electricity working. But without artificially cheap airline competition, they might be able to do it.

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garagewineMar. 19, 13 7:12 PM

"This is a dying industry, kept alive only by court-sanctioned abuse of the bankruptcy system, massive government subsidies, and blatant antitrust violations."---Which "massive government subsidies" are those? And how are they "abusing" the bankruptcy system?

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mn55066Mar. 19, 13 8:23 PM

Lies, lies, lies, lies. Both Delta an United said they would not cut back flights when they merged with Northwest and Continental, respectively, and both began cutting back as soon as the mergers were approved. US Airways/American will do the same.

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brotherkennyMar. 19, 13 9:02 PM

Subsidies are essential air services http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Essential_Air_Service, and TSA, the cost of which should be borne by the consumer of the service. Instead the TSA is paid for by taxes that come from everyone, including those that don't fly. The abuse of bankruptcy is done by all publicly traded corporations. Bankruptcy courts tend to pay out large investors when dividing assets of a bankrupt corporation, giving small investors nothing. The reasoning is the same as "too big to fail". The fairer thing to do would be to pay all investors an equal portions upon asset sale. Again, it is argued that the public good is better served by these processes. However, it's likely that it's done because some people have political access and others don't. It takes money to be cared about.

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