State: Data from license plate readers is private

  • Article by: Eric Roper , Star Tribune
  • Updated: March 18, 2013 - 8:48 PM

Agency agrees to a request by Minneapolis Mayor R.T. Rybak to reclassify, and thus protect, information on vehicle locations.

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wa0tdaMar. 19, 13 7:39 AM

The 4th Amendment continues to be eroded by technologies that no one imagined. Seemingly "public" acts like driving around with your license plate visible - and even walking in the public square with your face visible - can now be recorded and processed in ways that reveal your movements, and by inference your habits and intentions, no matter whether you have lived an exemplary life or if you are a criminal. The potential for misuse boggles the mind.

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owatonnabillMar. 19, 13 9:09 AM

"The potential for misuse boggles the mind." .............. Indeed! And you can be sure: if it can be misused, it will be misued. But some of this stuff is beyond scary. At an airport a few years back Spousal Unit and owatonnabill were changing airplanes and had to go through security in the process. Once at the checkpoint owatonnabill was asked to look toward a light, and instantly owatonnabill's name, address, passport # and a bunch of other stuff popped up on the guy's monitor. There was nothing much to distinguish this light from any other and if you ever saw one outside of an airport you wouldn't think twice about looking at it. Now we can't control what goes on in foreign airports (do they use those gizmos here too?) but what is to stop anyone in a public place, business, whatever, from reading your retina with one of those deals and then selling whatever information is kept electronically about you (Email and physical address, phone, type of car, recent credit card purchases, etc. etc.) to whomever might want it? We might say there are laws against that--but are there really? And if so, would they really stop anyone from that sort of monitoring for whatever reason he/she thought was sufficient?

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rambler89Mar. 19, 13 1:59 PM

At some point we're going to have to tell police--and quite a few other people--that some technology is simply forbidden. There are already too many police who act as if everyone is a criminal except cops and their relatives and the rich and powerful.

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songczarMar. 19, 13 2:56 PM

As usual the police and authorities get what they want and the public is locked out. Shocking.

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