Minnesota can lead the charge against bullying

  • Article by: Jim Davnie and Scott Dibble
  • Updated: March 18, 2013 - 6:39 PM

The state has waited too long, but the pieces are in place for progress.

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goferfanzMar. 18, 13 7:41 PM

Sure, and now like standardized testing centers (ie Prometrix), we can just keep our students our 100% continuous video surveillance. What could go wrong? Oh yeah, even the busiest week finds students in school barely 20% of their week, aka 35 of 168 hours. Of course, then there are vacations, summers, and the connectivity of social media...the latter so well-demonstrated in the brutal Stuebenville case. Efforts would be much better spent on either avoidance of unpleasant situations, or developing the long lost art of "coping skills." Our govt-run education monopoly, aka also a single payer system, has terribly failed our students in recent decades. Sure, let's have our DFL'ers try, try again ;o)

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jbpaperMar. 18, 13 8:02 PM

"While Minnesota has done much to try to raise achievement, including establishing academic standards, requiring high-stakes standardized tests, increasing scrutiny over teachers and principals, and other initiatives, we have little success to show for all that work. But we now have the opportunity to position the state as a leader in the next generation of education reform by focusing on building strong, safe and supportive school climates for all students." ---- In other word, since we failed at the basics lets try to do something else and see if we can get that right.

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jbpaperMar. 18, 13 8:05 PM

One thing that baffles me. During all the gay marriage debates I kept hearing about how the younger generation is more tolerant than us old folks. Why is it then that we need all these new measures that weren't needed back when us old intolerant people were in school?

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bluemaxMar. 18, 13 9:07 PM

Johnny called me a bad name, I think I will a accuse him of bullying me so he gets expelled!

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okaybruceMar. 18, 13 9:19 PM

Typical of those who are true believers in the religion of progress. They truly believe that with enough money and political will, they can eliminate all suffering. Mind you, this is a much a myth as the tooth fairy, but they believe nonetheless. Its not going to happen - the elimination of all suffering - so how about we spend our money and political will in areas that may actually help people have the chance to flourish, knowing that not all will, but doing the best we can? Enough of this utopian pipe dream progressives are selling.

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BABloomMar. 18, 13 9:45 PM

Thank you on behalf of all parents who've sent children to school fearing that they would physically or emotionally hurt by their peers without the school intervening. With the increased focus and tools provided by this law all of our children will benefit.

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gardengurlMar. 19, 13 5:15 AM

Thank you for your work on this legislation. Now please make sure there is funding to help schools achieve these goals.

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mohawk1953Mar. 19, 13 7:33 AM

Here's another case of the legislature passing a law, and thinking because they've done so, the problem will go away. Bullying has been here since the beginning of time, in every culture, and will always be here, regardless of the laws that are passed. It seems worse now because of a higher tolerance for violence in the US, and technology and media has made it more visible.

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firefight41Mar. 19, 1311:42 AM

Providing safe and supportive school environments is a necessary precursor for learning. Minnesota has long been noted for having the weakest antibullying statute in the country. ************** How is a statute going to provide safe and supportive school environments for the kids?

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dschachenmeyerMar. 19, 1312:23 PM

If this law is actually passed, you are likely to see some first amendment challenges heading to court because of the broad way the law defines bullying. For example, let's saying that during the course of a social studies discussion on gay marriage a student expresses the opinion (not directed at any one person) that he or she is opposed to gay marriage because the bible says it is wrong. According to the language of the law, if a gay student perceives that statement to create imbalance of power or has a detrimental emotional effect as a result of that statement, it is classified as bullying and the student holding that opinion can be reprimanded. It places limits on the expression of free speech. Another problem is the application for "cyberbullying". As written, the law places the impossible burden on the schools to monitor private emails, texts, social media posts, etc, of all of its students. Not just on school devices such as classroom computer or tablets, but any electronic device including personal ones.

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