Minn. moose tracking finds wolves taking a share

  • Article by: Associated Press
  • Updated: March 19, 2013 - 7:05 AM
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spartan227Mar. 18, 1310:25 AM

Now collar the calves and you will see over 50% killed by wolves...

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scrotalfocciMar. 18, 13 3:30 PM

Who else would eat a moose other than a wolf or a human?

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mn_windchillMar. 18, 13 3:36 PM

What makes the DNR think the 2 were not also 'capture related' and the wolves took advantage of the weakened animal? Like the Grand Portage moose that was weakened by pneunomia before being killed by wolves. Dept. of Nuts with Rifles is a moniker that sticks...

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davidshellMar. 18, 13 5:52 PM

Wolves are persecuted out of fear and ignorance. They are important for ecological balance, and promote the well-being of prey species.

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puckster55picsMar. 18, 13 9:48 PM

Only our DNR can take 6 dead moose 4 of which they are Solely Responsible for & two wolf killed moose with the wolves targeting the Sick & weakened animals and the wolves get the Blame! Only in DNR math is 2 More than 4 & they wonder why we do NOT trust them managing our wolf population? Because you are Incompetent & we have ZERO confidence in your ability to manage ANYTHING! We have zebra mussels & Asian Carp over-running our lakes & we are running out of moose,Please start managing the Invasive species First & leave our Native species the heck alone-they'll survive & thrive better Without you!

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jessiestepanekMar. 18, 1310:07 PM

What a ridiculous headline. A more appropriate title would be 'Minn. moose tracking finds DNR taking a share' - seeing as how the process of capturing and collaring killed more moose than wolves did. Try a little harder. You are responsible for shaping public opinion on important issues, and it should be taken seriously.

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blueskydayMar. 18, 1310:39 PM

DNR researchers: 4 dead moose; Wolves 2 (sick, weakened animals per another article). So we're spending a million dollars to track dead moose and killing off more in the process. Gee, how can we make this a PR win? Blame the wolf! Blame the wolf, beat the drums so we can kill them off after spending millions to save them. Win win for DNR job security. Newsflash: wolves and moose evolved together for thousands of years. Another DNR fail.

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sooozeMar. 18, 1311:09 PM

On February 21 2013 as part of its "Our World" lecture series, The Minnesota Zoo sponsored a talk called, "Moose Mysteries: understanding an iconic Minnesota mammal. In this talk, Minnesota Zoo biologist, Dr. Nick McCann discussed some of the reasons moose are disappearing from Minnesota's forests. He said that while scientists can't point to one specific cause of the dramatic decline in moose numbers, climate change seems to be a driving factor. Researchers speculate that even a small rise in average temperatures may cause heat stress among moose, rendering them more vulnerable to parasites, such as ticks, that they, in colder times, were better able to withstand. White-tail deer are moving northward into moose country, in part due decreasing winter snow-depth, competing for browse, and bringing with them parasites such as liver flukes and brain worms, that, though not lethal to the deer, are fatal to the moose. Dr. McCann presented data on moose mortality that showed that predation by wolves cause fewer moose deaths in Minnesota than do collisions with motor vehicles. According to this article, so does the research process itself, so why, then, does this newspaper even mention wolves in its headline? Wouldn't it be more useful, to the moose, to the wolf, to the TRUTH, to examine the real threats to Minnesota's moose population?

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TwentysnailsMar. 19, 1312:19 AM

Wolves tend to kill when they are hungry and tend to eat almost all of what they kill...especially when they are hunting and eating in packs. Minnesota's wolf cull broke up packs, meaning many wolves whose packs no longer exist may be relying on carrion, the decaying flesh of dead animals they find in the wilderness. The moose may have been already dead by the time a wolf found it. Should wolves have killed the moose...the prey must have been vulnerable and a weak member of the herd with strong odds against its long term survival. The notion that wolves are savage beasts that must be killed by federal, state and private agencies, has no scientific research of any merit to support it.

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simplyhockeyMar. 19, 13 7:39 AM

Going to the next lecture or whatever the source of information that most people get their so called facts from is not going to solve this problem. It's boots on the ground and money to fund the program will help save the moose I hope! You can blast the DNR for the death of 4 moose after being fit with collars but they have to find out what is killing them. Or you can blame it all on hunting as some of you like to do. Deer have been in the area that is being discussed for a long long time through rise and fall of the moose population. During the period that the moose was doing much better the wolf population was under control. But just like so many other things it's a bunch of problems balled up into one that are probably the true cause. Disease,wolves,hunting led to a decimated herd. If the DNR told all of us the truth they really don't know for sure how many of anything remain in the state. It's either way under the number they say or way over ie: the wolf estimate. Maybe just maybe after logging is done they should consider planting maple or other forage the moose will eat instead of planting pine trees all over the forest. Pine trees will not help sustain moose,grouse or deer so why continue to plant thousands of acres of pines? Right now why don't all of you that are hell bent on the wolf start worrying about the moose because if something is not figured out they will be gone from the Minnesota landscape and that would be a tragic loss! Next lecture is scheduled for Thursday night. Topic Once the moose and deer are gone from the arrowhead region what will the wolves eat next? Just like every other problem with animals or humans SCIENCE is the only thing that will fix this. I admit the wolf is not my favorite animal but I really want everyone to change their focus and put it on the moose for a period of time until this problem is solved. Then let's go back to arguing if the wolf is really a great thing to have an over abundance of. By that time we will be talking about the cougars that are starting to roam the woods and fields of Minnesota. Yikes!

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