Minnesota's charitable-gaming shortfall: An explanation

  • Article by: Allen Lund
  • Updated: March 16, 2013 - 8:09 AM

A lack of regulatory approval has delayed the full rollout that would produce the expected revenue for the Vikings stadium.

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supervon2Mar. 15, 13 8:15 PM

Well, the Liberals are not happy. They are going to stand in the bars and make certain people are gambling their "fare Share". It's only right that the rich should partake as they have more money so mandantory tickets will be delivered to their homes and their bank accounts charged.

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RossbergMar. 15, 13 9:42 PM

First we were assured that people would flock to bars and be standing in long lines to spend millions on e-pulltabs. Then we heard is was a matter of mere weeks until thousands of bars and other venues would be offering them to an eager public. Then we were told that the solution was to put e-pulltabs at the airport bars and stopover fliers would while away their layovers by spending millions on them. Now we hear that e-bingo will generate the millions to make up for the current monthly shortfalls. The reality is, according to the state's website where the results are listed, is that people try the games when they're first introduced in a bar and then the sales per device quickly decline. It's hard to interpret that as anything other than a gambling method in which the public is not interested in participating. The state has tried to mask this by saying that adding more new sites is the solution to all this. If this sounds familiar it's because it's nothing more than a Ponzi or pyramid scheme where the success of the venture depends on an ever-increasing number of "investors" in pulltabs until you run out of them and then it all collapses. We have no business being in this venture and should be smart enough to see why every other state and other organizations has stayed away from it. It was always just a scheme which had no historical success and was devised simply to get the stadium approved without a lot of dissension.

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capitolwatchMar. 16, 13 6:29 AM

Once again, it's all the regulators fault. Simple enough. But wait until electric bingo hits the bars folks, that's when the real action will start. Six people with iPads and a flat screen, now that's a really good time, all the rollicking action of paper pull tabs. I can imagine sitting around with my friends at the bar next fall: "Another beer?" -- Are you joking, I need to concentrate on my cards. "Check out AP, he just had a 20 yard run" -- Don't bother me, I need B6 to drop so I can win $2.00. Next stop, Perkins for a cup of coffee and slice of pie. Didn't something just like this bingo deal fail a couple years back? Now it's going to build a stadium?

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marcymmbMar. 16, 13 6:40 AM

This is absolutely hilarious, but just wait another couple of weeks they will come out with another explanation. Don't you think they should have been up and ready to go from day one. As a pull tab junkie I could have told you this was not going to work.

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bluedevil101Mar. 16, 13 8:22 AM

Just like Obama's "shovel ready projects"--and then he had the gall to laugh after all the money was wasted. Dayton and his Republican buddies are laughing at us-they got what they wanted, regardless of the citizens views. Well, we got rid of his Republican buddies-soon it will be time to get rid of Dayton.

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thedanmanMar. 16, 13 9:04 AM

In regards to the government getting on the ball, they might have onerous regulations to work through (highly likely) or the gaming regulators might be understaffed (quite possible). Remains to be seen what the level will be when fully implemented. Somewhat related, hopefully we can get some online poker access back. Used to like the bi-weekly game with friends around the metro and parts further away.

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dahdahMar. 16, 13 9:20 AM

Let's hope that an article on this very topic runs one year from today; if it does, it will describe a huge pull tabs shortfall, just as most of us predicted during the debate overt the stadium financing last year. My own opinion is that only the governor and a few Republican hayseeds up north truly believed that pull tab financing was viable; no one else did, and that included other legislators, the Wilf organization, Ted Mondale, and the public. Some of us quoted the observation made by Lori Sturdevant of this newspaper when she was interviewed on the public access channel: that pull tab financing was a questionable "loser pays" form of funding a large public works project---and by that she meant that a few cents of the money a person pays for a losing pull tab goes to fund the stadium---the person who makes a bad bet pays. This was absurd then, and it is even more ludicrous today, as seen from the admissions in this article. Last year, most of us realized that pull tab financing was a cover to simply pass the stadium bill---and that real public tax money must have to be appropriated later to make up a gigantic shortfall. In other words, public taxpayer funding is inevitable. Let's wait one year and revisit this topic.

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rshacklefordMar. 16, 1310:19 AM

(article subtitle): "A lack of regulatory approval has delayed the full rollout that would produce the expected revenue for the Vikings stadium." ---- Nope. Neighborhood bar owners and patrons want to give to truly needy groups, not a multi-billion dollar FOR PROFIT industry. And, the tepid public response has made companies think twice about providing the "service." Nice try though. What is the next lame excuse that Dayton, the Peoples' Stadium faux-thority, and the NFL provided to you? Better yet, just give us all of the lame excuses so the public can shoot gaping holes in them and move onto placing the funding responsibility on personal seat licenses. The game attendees wanted this so bad (they camped at the Capitol), then they can pay for it. They can even black-out the games so they get their very own "exclusive experience." The problem with that is that no one at home would even care or miss the New Jersey based team! BTW, do the replica jerseys that cost $150+ come with velcro names and numbers so they can be changed each season? What is a Harvin jersey worth now??

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tupelohoneyMar. 16, 1312:10 PM

Relying on gambling to fund the pet projects of the politicians is foolish. Relying on gambling to fund necessary government functions is beyond foolish and is irresponsible.

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getcrazyMar. 16, 13 1:30 PM

@supervon2--"Well, the Liberals are not happy. They are going to stand in the bars and make certain people are gambling their "fare Share". It's only right that the rich should partake as they have more money so mandantory tickets will be delivered to their homes and their bank accounts charged."---I'm not sure that this jives with what is actually happening. All Minnesotans are being forced to fund a stadium for a billionaire team owner when the NFL could have taken that money from it's $9 -$10 billion in profit last year and paid for it themselves instead of stealing money from the middle class conservatives and middle class liberals, the poor....

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