Minnesota government won't buy antibacterial products

  • Article by: Josephine Marcotty , Star Tribune
  • Updated: March 5, 2013 - 11:02 AM

Minnesota agencies won’t be allowed to buy products containing triclosan due to concern about contaminants it creates in lakes and rivers.

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rlwr51Mar. 4, 1311:04 PM

Good - And everyone else should quit buying them...and quit using hand sanitizer unless you are somewhere where there is no soap and water available.

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mplsjoejoMar. 4, 1311:10 PM

The anti bacterial soap was just another stupid marketing ploy to get people to buy chemically laced soap that doesn't perform any better than plain old fashion soap. We need to stop the stupid insanity and I am glad the State has decided to stop using this junk. We have enough non-biodegradable chemicals in our product stream. All soaps are are anti bacterial. Adding poisons to our soap doesn't help anything, only gets the idiots to buy a new product. Stop using liquid soaps and get back to old school soaps that are biodegradable.

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basia2186Mar. 5, 13 3:52 AM

Never fell for the liquid soap thing. Much prefer old school bars.

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jdcarlinMar. 5, 13 3:54 AM

Good. All soap is naturally antibacterial. Soap breaks down the lipids in bacteria (essentially, a fat) which kills it. Adding another chemical is unnecessary, and it doesn't break down, nor is it filtered out by water treatment facilities, so it just ends up polluting the environment. Just regular soap works perfectly fine.

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smarterthanuMar. 5, 13 4:59 AM

Unfortunately, there is little or no soap available that doesn't contain antibacterial ingredients.

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sinnigMar. 5, 13 6:35 AM

Now if only we could ban all the obnoxious fragrances.

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murphydogMar. 5, 13 7:23 AM

It must also affect the process that allows bacteria to work in septic systems.

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cavellMar. 5, 13 7:23 AM

Ahh, just quit washing ur hands.

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earneditMar. 5, 13 7:27 AM

All the bugs in my septic tank are going to be so happy...

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ruphinaMar. 5, 13 7:55 AM

Another chicken little moment. All they proved with their little study is that they can measure tiny amounts of the residue. They have nothing to show it does any harm, and their big scare article a couple months back was very careful to omit any quantitative measurement. All it had was vague percentage numbers like twice as much here as there. Twice damn near nothing is still damn near nothing. BTW, are they extending this ban to all the stuff they use to clean their public restrooms? Can they be sued if the new "safe" stuff allows bacteria to cause illness? And of course, how much more will they be spending for the new cleaners? Bill G.

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