For Minnesota health system, landmark legislation

  • Article by: Star Tribune Editorial Board
  • Updated: March 2, 2013 - 5:23 PM

Lawmakers set to reshape Minnesota’s health insurance landscape.

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goferfanzMar. 2, 13 8:22 AM

Reform? Drive down costs? Again, the naivete present in this column borders on silly. Health costs, or controlling them, isn't rocket science. It is a function of 3 simple things each year--->we as patients visit the doctor less often/doctors order less tests or procedures/the health system charges less per visit or test....... Yet, expanding coverage to millions more patients will magically......reduce visits? less testing or procedures? charges will go down when more overflow patients are shunted to UC or ER? People may wonder how we have arrived at a moment in time when 1-1.5 Trillion dollar deficits are the norm, but this column should leave no doubt our media really is either accidentally or intentionally misleading about financial realities, in this case, healthcare spending.

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comment229Mar. 2, 13 5:26 PM

Funny how my local republican representative sent out a survey with a question about the 3.5% tax and apparently forgot to mention that the senate plan was funded for free.

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comment229Mar. 2, 13 5:30 PM

The comment was made about how to save money by limiting visits to the doctor? I can say that my friends and I, with catastrophic anti bankruptcy high premium policies, NEVER go to the doctor unless it is for broken bones. This is the new America for anyone getting older and without group health. I have accepted this as the new norm... now, I may have some serious problems that may eventually cause my death, and that is the new definition of death squads in our country. You decide whose fault it is, but simply, we use the internet to diagnose our problems and then get OTC drugs. Is this good? Nope... but it is what we have right now. I welcome any help I can get through Obamacare. Simply, it cannot get any worse than it is right now with Blue Cross Blue Shield.

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arspartzMar. 2, 13 6:10 PM

"The bills clearly reflect the DFL’s vision for the exchange, in particular by giving the exchange’s board considerable authority to limit which plans will be sold in the exchange." -- Can someone point out an economics text or theory that shows that the best way to lower prices is to limit supply?

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marcymmbMar. 2, 13 8:27 PM

Comment229, nothing is free.

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goferfanzMar. 2, 13 9:47 PM

"""The comment was made about how to save money by limiting visits to the doctor?"""..... Actually, that comment wasn't made, but dont let facts get in the way of your comment. The original comment addressed the very simple, very obvious items that directly influence health spending.

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supervon2Mar. 3, 13 5:38 AM

However, state workers (read organized Union) will continue to have full ride health care witl everything paid for. The general public will have to pay pay and pay for the elites.

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texas_technomanMar. 3, 13 6:21 AM

I find it humorous that 18 states are "building their own" exchange. Why re-invent the wheel....and exchange should be no different than buying something from Amazon.com. You plug in what you want, the system offers back various options, you pick which one you want, bingo...you have health care. In fact, maybe we should hire Amazon to build it, and run it...bet it would be cheaper! And the high cost of health care isn't about a couple of tests....it's the middle man. Didn't the CEO of United Health get paid $47m last year? What does that tell you!

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eman2001Mar. 3, 13 6:45 AM

Is this exchange really much more than just doing a Google search and comparing insurance costs and benefits among different providers? And how many millions are we paying for this?

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mn2niceMar. 3, 13 7:58 AM

When I purchased medigap supplemental insurance a few months back I had three choices presented to me: 1) buy nothing and continue paying the 20% or so Medicare does not pay, 2) buy insurance that has a copay for drugs, has a copay for office visits, and pays for much of everything else, and 3) buy the most expensive plan with no copays and everything is mostly covered. Three choices isn't much of a choice. Hopefully this exchange will offer more than just a couple of choices. Because if you need to see the doctor more than just once in a month, those copays start to add up in a hurry.

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