Time to stick to furniture? Ikea withdraws meatballs in Europe due to horse meat fears

  • Article by: KARL RITTER , Associated Press
  • Updated: February 25, 2013 - 4:13 PM
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  • Comments

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rvjesseFeb. 25, 13 7:34 AM

It is best to make your own food from ingredients you know. My spouse says otherwise you get "mystery meat"

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esandeenFeb. 25, 13 7:53 AM

When people ask me why I'm a vegetarian, now I have another answer. ;)

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editor29Feb. 25, 13 8:03 AM

The larger question is: Did those Ikea meatballs come with easy-to-follow assembly instructions?

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heretical1Feb. 25, 13 8:05 AM

Technically, there isn't anything wrong with horse meat. In fact, it's perfectly normal to eat in some cultures. I know companies need to be honest and actually put into a product what the label says, but people are acting like someone threw poison into these foods, when a person can digest horse meat just as easily as beef, and your body won't know the difference. I know it's hard for Americans to think of a horse as food, because we usually see them as pets. But horses, like cats, dogs, guinea pigs, and many other pets, pose no more health risk when properly cooked and eaten than cows, pigs, chicken, or any other livestock. Also, since it keeps taking laboratory tests to find these instances of horse meat "contamination," and no one has said, "My food tastes funny," maybe horse isn't so bad.

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olson123456Feb. 25, 13 8:27 AM

In a related story, traces of wood were reportedly found recently in Ikea furniture.

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swmnguyFeb. 25, 13 8:47 AM

As other posters have pointed out, there's nothing wrong with horsemeat. On the other hand, there's something very wrong with food sellers' not knowing, or at least having developed a system that allows them to pretend they don't know, what they're selling.

Across the world, the ongoing collapse of our financial system and the need to increase profits at any cost is destroying the ability of consumers to continue to consume. You can't skim off 40% of all economic activity to "friction;" the carrying costs of an incredibly inefficient corporate finance structure; and not see serious damage to the system. So there's huge incentive to cheapen all products, to keep margins high, since consumers can't pay higher prices.

If it isn't horsemeat, we should check for sawdust or ground-up cardboard in "meat product." We really do need the inspection systems we used to have. That's why we enacted them in the first place. Without such systems in place, the profits to be made selling adulterated products of all kinds is just too enticing for companies to resist. As is being demonstrated.

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swmnguyFeb. 25, 13 8:48 AM

"olson123456" posted, "In a related story, traces of wood were reportedly found recently in Ikea furniture."

Proof, please. I find that very hard to believe.

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trice01Feb. 25, 13 8:55 AM

The US Army served us horsemeat in the 1970's. It was actually rather tasty.

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marathongirlFeb. 25, 13 9:38 AM

As others have said, there isn't anything wrong with eating horse meat, but for those that choose not to, the labeling of it being pork and beef and then finding out it's horse as well is wrong. We should have read access and knowledge of everything that is in our food. Unfortunately even buying it someplace you don't know. Look at the pink slime example...wasn't labeled. You also don't know how the food has been modified. Pretty soon GMO salmon, that has been genetically mixed with other fish, so not a true salmon at all, but won't be labled as such either. A fish is a fish right? And meat is meat right? But don't you want to know? Especially if say you have some type of allergy?

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freedomallFeb. 25, 13 9:59 AM

Well I'm glad I am Vegetarian.

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