Schafer: Talent is the key to Twin Cities' cluster of giant firms

  • Article by: LEE SCHAFER , Star Tribune
  • Updated: February 21, 2013 - 9:40 PM

Myles Shaver has been puzzling over the unusually large number of Fortune 500 companies in the Twin Cities almost since joining the faculty of the University of Minnesota’s Carlson School of Management in 2001.

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regionguyFeb. 21, 13 9:11 PM

I look forward to hearing more on htis as it moves forward. I have always been struck by the scientific/engineering/technical talent ppol here, and it certainly cuts across industries. Over the years I have seen many people in the medical device industry who worked for computer companies like Control Data here in the 1970's.

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turkey_88Feb. 22, 13 7:48 AM

Ironic, a comment in the story by the "Honeywell Endowed Chair", ostensibly named for a company that moved out.. hopefully these companies don't cut themselves off at the knees by the current "race to be cheapest". Outsourcing entry level jobs instead of hiring for them just means no future talent pool to draw from, very short sighted.

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BVMannFeb. 22, 13 9:32 AM

I share concern with turkey_88.....in this now overly globalized economy, local firms are being snapped up by larger corporate entities that have little to no concern with local culture. The result is decay & destruction of what took so long to build up here. One of the ways to stop it is to stop rewarding corporations with tax breaks for outsourcing.

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mnethicsFeb. 22, 1310:14 AM

They always say if your only tool is a hammer all the issues look like nails. Leave it to a transplanted Canadian professor of management to suggest – now so shockingly -- that management talent that is the key to the Twin Cities' robust corporate sector. Others of us may attribute this business superiority to such things as Scottish “enterprising” mentality, Norwegian “go-Viking” risk taking, Minnesota Principles(Caux Rountable’s) immutable blurring of business and societal good, an abundance of natural resources (paper, minerals,etc.) and/or tradition of trading (grain) and the money and financial services industry that encouraged seed and venture investing.

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raymarshFeb. 22, 13 1:55 PM

I find it incredible that a Professor at the University of Minnesota would not mention that University, the other state colleges and universities and the billions of dollars that the state spends on education at all levels as a major factor in the quality of the Minnesota workforce.

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tacotonyFeb. 22, 13 2:31 PM

No surprises here, Quality of life trumps all perceived negatives including our tax rates.

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pitythefoolsFeb. 23, 13 9:32 AM

Just think how much better it would be if Pawlenty hadn't spent all those years telling the world how bad Minnesota is for business!

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