Teen: Shortcuts in speech just sound lazy.

  • Article by: Xandi Swedberg
  • Updated: February 19, 2013 - 8:44 PM

Listen, peeps … uh, people: Abbreviating every other word just makes you lazy.

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gandalf48Feb. 20, 13 8:52 AM

I'm pretty sure that the point of speaking like a teenager has much more to do with fitting in than being lazy. Most teenagers understand and can speak standard English but they make a choice to speak to their peers using slang and abbreviations to sound cool and to differentiate themselves from adults. It has the added advantage of being harder for adults (parents/teachers) to fully understand what the conversation is about. Feel free to speak however you want...just remember that you will most likely sound ignorant if you continue to speak "teenager" in a professional setting like while you're working at a job. Also, try to drop the "teenager" dialect by the time you are no longer a teenager (you know right around your sophomore year of college).

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Thumper5316Feb. 20, 13 9:43 AM

gandalf48, I agree 100%. As a professional I endure, daily, highly intelligent young people that can't speak a full sentence without inserting "like" at least two times. Emails are painful to read with the spelling and grammatical errors. Please young people, I'm your coworker or supervisor; not your 'peep'.

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jgmanciniFeb. 20, 13 1:59 PM

Agreed on the comments so far. My manager let a young temp go recently because he opened every email to her with "hey", often called her "dude", and didn't seem to get the concept of checking his work before he submitted it. Not smart. But I am very encouraged by the articulate, intelligent, well written essays by high school students today. It gives me hope that the upcoming generation will find their way.

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pokey2007Feb. 20, 13 8:12 PM

I agree, but must even include the letter 'k' for okay.

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lissibFeb. 21, 13 6:29 PM

Hello! I would just like to add a linguistic perspective to the conversation. While certainly many people do find abbreviations and "clipped words" distasteful, they are not necessarily a sign of laziness or lack of sophistication. Moreover, they have a long, long history in English. "Coz," for example, is an abbreviation, used very often in Shakespeare. If you are interested in a history of "abbrevs" or "clipped words," there is an entire history and dictionary on the subject, which you can preview in google books: http://tinyurl.com/9wnbxrl Shorthand has a very long history as well, going back at least as far as the 18th century: http://artsbeat.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/08/06/a-brief-history-of-shorthand/ The point being, while certainly in professional contexts it is wise not to say words like "probs" (for example), using such words is not a sign of a lazy character--and the practice is nothing new. Try searching for "under the circs" in google books: https://www.google.com/search?q=%22under+the+circs%22&btnG=Search+Books&tbm=bks&tbo=1 It's totes interesting:)

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myob_STFeb. 22, 13 6:45 PM

I was recently corrected by a twenty-something co-worker that he was most certainly not a "guy." The word, he said, is "Dude."

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