Musicians mull 'play-talk' deal with St. Paul Chamber Orchestra

  • Article by: GRAYDON ROYCE , Star Tribune
  • Updated: February 12, 2013 - 7:59 PM

If they accept, concerts would resume while negotiators hammer out a final contract.

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gofurnuttFeb. 12, 13 7:22 PM

On the one hand, It's an entertainment area that is hard to sell. Quality Historical Music over Current Pop culture always seems to take a back seat in the Public Interest. It is the ARTS, which must be kept, But it is also a business. How can It pay for Itself? But on the Other Hand, $56,000 Is not a livable wage, and especially for Educated and Trained employees with an advanced skill set.

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wilfcharityFeb. 12, 13 8:19 PM

Can't we just raise taxes? These people deserve every penny they earn. They protect us and defend our way of life. Wait wrong post. sorry.

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lee4713Feb. 12, 13 8:45 PM

We the audience members are perfectly willing to raise ticket prices, because the SPCO has priced tickets so low it's an insult. It shows that they don't value the quality - all in the name of "access". Well, they locked out the musicians - what kind of access is THAT. And yes, musicians deserve every penny. I'd much rather they get six figure salaries than banksters and corporate raiders. Without music, "our way of life" won't be worth defending.

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hermajestyFeb. 12, 13 9:41 PM

I wrote to the MN Orchestra board asking why they kept saying the musicians hadn't made a counter-offer when they had in fact agreed to submit to arbitration--which is very risky for them, since the arbiter could decide against them. A board member wrote back saying that no arbiter could possibly understand the orchestra's finances and that the board didn't want outsiders telling them how to run the organization. Rrrriiiight, arbiters who have looked at the finances of all the major companies in Minnesota couldn't understand the Minnesota Orchestra (shakes head).

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d434478Feb. 12, 1311:19 PM

Both sides need to understand that population continues to mature. Who is going to fill the seats in the future? Whether sports or music...both sides lose as people take their entertainment dollars elsewhere...and some never come back. Just boring to have all of these strikes with people in industries that are non-essential. Who cares?

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localokelFeb. 13, 13 8:11 AM

There will always be a significant minority that wasn't given exposure to music as a child or is tone deaf, but their aggressive presence on these topics here online at the Star is a bit of a puzzle. Perhaps they should watch their DVDs without music (most often Hollywood employs serious art music performed by full orchestra) and see if music is "essential." Or, perhaps they should consider whether their football, baseball, basketball or hockey arena is "essential" during a budget shortfall. Perhaps too all sports, not just art classes, should be removed from school curricula or paid entirely from parent donations and student bake sales, uniforms and stadiums included. It would be a shame to have to import our classical musicians to fill the ranks of important American orchestras. SPCO salaries are shocking low (unexpectedly much lower than the MO) particularly for their training and professional costs (string instruments can cost as much as a house and require expensive artisan craftsmen to maintain). Yet, an active loving supportive audience must be cultivated, government and wealthy can't alone pay for it. This is a difficult challenge for these organizations right now. I personally am in no position to help now due to my financial position but some who can seem willing to step forward.

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