U to experiment with year-round degree programs

  • Article by: JENNA ROSS , Star Tribune
  • Updated: February 8, 2013 - 10:03 PM

Summer will offer full course loads, but will students sign up? After study, U leaders decided 'carefully and thoughtfully' was best approach. Pilots in the College of Design start next fall.

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DufferHFeb. 8, 1310:52 PM

Who says this is a "hot idea?" The university from which I graduated in 1964 (almost 50 years ago) had a three-year B.A. degree program. This is nothing new.

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tapedeckFeb. 8, 1311:37 PM

I will graduate from the U of M before being able to make use of this program (I double major in economics and statistics); however, I would definitely have made use of it. I am attending under the post-9/11 G.I. Bill. That is a 36 month entitlement. School is paid for any 36 months that I attend school. This basically means that I must attend full time while using the entitlement, if I hope to graduate entirely under the G.I. Bill. That exempts me from summer classes; I can't afford to waste a full-time entitlement on part-time school. This new plan works well for recent military veterans.

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freedomallFeb. 9, 13 1:48 AM

The U of M should start focusing on the way of the future: Online Accredited Courses...

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coop0188Feb. 9, 13 4:42 AM

This is a good idea, but Kaler also needs to consider how improvement projects are going to happen. They often happen during the summer because the buildings/classrooms aren't being used. Also, there are some programs that really can't be condensed any further. I'm thinking of some nursing and engineering courses. These would almost certainly require a 10-14 week course to get everything done and allow someone to take the course load. Also, students have been taking gen eds in the summer forever. When I was a Regent's scholar, I used to take extra courses in the summer before tuition went up in the fall.

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rms316Feb. 9, 13 6:18 AM

The sooner one finishes school, it seems, the earlier their working career could start. Make sense to me.

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localguyFeb. 9, 13 8:12 AM

This is a potentially good idea, but it's a pipe dream. I took summer classes and graduated in 3 years, but few others did. The U has seen offering Summer classes for years, but very few students sign up. Why will it be different now?

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EviFeb. 9, 13 8:20 AM

Graduate quick - still no jobs. DufferH, there was 'quicky degrees' 50 years ago because we needed a workforce quickly. So, your statement is full of inaccurate information

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timandtiaFeb. 9, 13 8:37 AM

You know what, I went and got my Master's degree in Management at a school that went year round. It was the "best" experience I ever had whil attending college. Even today, I miss this school. Hope the U will really get this going, students won't know what they are missing out on! Know wonder I support high schools to do the same.

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pitythefoolsFeb. 9, 13 8:41 AM

How about just cutting costs instead? There is no valid reason for the U to have increased tuition at twice the rate of inflation for the last three decades.

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elmore1Feb. 9, 13 8:58 AM

Provide lower tuition pricing on this program. It will result in savings to the U (less staff required) and the savings should be passed on as an incentive to the students. Students should be incented to get their degree and get out in the workforce quickly with minimal debt. Those who want to be professional students can stay as long as they like, rack up huge debt, but it is their choice.

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