Too many moderates in Congress are quitting

  • Article by: EDITORIAL BOARD , Star Tribune
  • Updated: February 7, 2013 - 7:18 PM

Why U.S. Senate problem-solvers say they are headed for the exits.

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wanderso2Feb. 7, 13 7:34 PM

What a sad commentary on our poisonous political atmosphere today. Everett Dirksen and Hubert Humphrey, among other true statesmen, must be turning over in their graves.

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Packman_1Feb. 7, 13 7:54 PM

At least we have 2016 to look forward to. GOP govenors are now trying to bypass the electoral college because orf the trouncing Romney took in the last election. Heh...if you can't win fairly, change the rules.

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ninetyninerFeb. 7, 13 7:58 PM

There's only one party that is forcing moderates out and that is the GOP. You can thank the Southern ultra-conservative religious right for that too going all the way back to Nixon's loss in the 70's. Hee haw!!

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ciamanFeb. 7, 13 8:09 PM

Why did I know that this article would, in the end, all turn around about attacking the Republicans? You all know that Constitutional system collided with the new politics of Democrats and Republicans. Do not try to get by blaming everything on the GOP party. There is plenty of blame for the loss of good politicians. And our President. What goes around comes around and better think about all of that.

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goferfanzFeb. 7, 13 8:56 PM

"""Do not try to get by blaming everything on the GOP """.......Sure, Dems have been the dominant Washington party since 1/2007, but somehow that isnt mentioned in this article. Even better, for Obama's 65 million votes, or Romney's 61 million votes, there were 100 million citizens that did NOT vote. There's plenty of available voters IF voters want moderates. Somehow, the moderates dont attract voters, do they?

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brotherkennyFeb. 7, 13 9:30 PM

Antagonism and vitriol spewed by some politicians looks a lot more like reality TV and thus allows the purveyors of these commodities to more easily differentiate themselves from the ho-hum seller of stability and sound policy, making it easier to get elected, especially without experience or without skill. Policy and legislation typically gets applied to some very dull topics, being able to hit hot button topics, or make duller topic seem more contentious attracts the attention of the less than engaged members of our society, and these minorities can be the difference in elections. So, it's part of the spectacle that attracts a certain segment of voters.

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thisisinsaneFeb. 7, 1310:18 PM

"Even better, for Obama's 65 million votes, or Romney's 61 million votes, there were 100 million citizens that did NOT vote. There's plenty of available voters IF voters want moderates. Somehow, the moderates dont attract voters, do they?">>>>>>>>>regarding your last sentence, I don't know if that's exactly the problem. Perhaps it's that both D and R parties are so tightly controlled by their far extremists, that it's near impossible to get a moderate candidate selected out of the primary system. I see this both at the national level and here in MN.

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rimlickerFeb. 7, 1310:47 PM

Why not quit. They've made their cash. They'll get a fat retirement and free health and dental care for the rest of their lives. And I don't me Obamacare, they gave themselves a much better plan.

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comment229Feb. 8, 13 4:20 AM

Two things I know for sure; when you start talking about which members of congress are the problem, you will hear the answer loud and clear. "Well, it's not my congressman, it's yours." I have news for you. It's all of them. And finally, when you start quoting Tim Pawlenty, the article lost all credibility.

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comment229Feb. 8, 13 4:27 AM

Further, I am not sure if "moderates" are quitting as much as I see the tea party influence bogging down congress and holding their breaths until they turn blue. Boehner is a coward and will not stand up to them and have you noticed that he is now in the background and Cantor is giving the speeches? I don't like Newt, but, at least he didn't hop on the political rhetoric train just to keep his job. And if Boehner wants to look good, all he has to do is stand beside McConnell.... and what is his political rating in Kentucky right now; close to single digits? I would welcome a poll of the people of the USA, and ask one question. If congress is dysfunctional, which political party is mostly responsible for that? And who should be doing better in today's political spectrum? Anybody like me, with an I in front of their name.

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