U find could be key to cancer

  • Article by: MAURA LERNER , Star Tribune
  • Updated: February 6, 2013 - 9:04 PM

Scientists say the enzyme might cause cell mutation in breast cancer; next step is to find way to block it.

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StarquestFeb. 6, 1312:05 PM

In before the first winger comes and asks how much taxpayer money was "wasted" on this research.

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cinemajayFeb. 6, 1312:40 PM

Super proud that is was the U of M that discovered the cause. Other research universities are green with envy!

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olson123456Feb. 6, 13 1:55 PM

All I can hope for is their being able to parlay this discovery into treatment(s) as soon as practical. The cancer my wife has is not going to care one iota otherwise.

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jimmy68Feb. 6, 13 2:39 PM

awesome news! crossing my fingers for those who are suffering through this!

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donotbugmeFeb. 6, 13 2:47 PM

This is the sort of thing to keep in mind when people are ripping the U for spending money on other things than classroom instruction.

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moron100Feb. 6, 13 3:00 PM

Remember what he said "Probably Causes" now is it probable that it might not cause breast cancer as well? maybe its probably that it links it to something else that causes breast cancer.

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glyboualFeb. 6, 13 6:34 PM

Hey Maura why didn't you mention the people who are working on this project? I sincerely hope that if you guys find a cure that you all become muti-millionairs. Our society is a little screw up in opinion. We pay way too much to athletes and celebrities. Too all those people, when your dying why don't go to the Vikings stadium to heal your sickness and stop complaining about high cost of medicine. You guys done get paid enough, thank you to everyone below for your work. I just copy and pasted the name from the Nature article, hope I didn't missed anyone. Go go team, you guys made US Minnesota citizen proud. Michael B. Burns, Lela Lackey, Michael A. Carpenter, Anurag Rathore, Allison M. Land, Brandon Leonard, Eric W. Refsland, Delshanee Kotandeniya, Natalia Tretyakova, Jason B. Nikas, Douglas Yee, Nuri A. Temiz, Duncan E. Donohue, Rebecca M. McDougle, William L. Brown, Emily K. Law & Reuben S. Harris Contributions R.S.H. conceived and managed the overall project. M.B.B. assisted R.S.H. with experimental design, project management and manuscript preparation. M.B.B., E.W.R. and B.L. generated mRNA expression profiles; L.L. and E.K.L. performed microscopy; L.L. and A.R. performed biochemical fractionations and DNA deaminase assays; M.B.B. performed uracil quantifications; A.M.L. performed thymidine kinase fluctuations; A.R. generated 3D-PCR sequences; and L.L., A.M.L., A.R. and M.A.C. determined the effect of induced A3B overexpression. M.A.C. performed deaminase assays with recombinant protein; and M.A.C. and D.K. assisted with the HPLC-ESI-MS/MS set up. N.T. was involved in HPLC-ESI-MS/MS method development. J.B.N. conducted the search and performed the bioinformatic analysis of the microarray data and developed the normalization algorithm for this analysis. N.A.T., D.E.D. and M.B.B. contributed bioinformatic analyses. All authors contributed to manuscript revisions.

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mnfanintampaFeb. 6, 13 9:55 PM

Great News. We all know how devastating cancer is.

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rusty0101Feb. 6, 1311:47 PM

I see two possibilities for this, one preventative, blocking the enzyme to prevent a case of cancer from starting in women who have previously been diagnosed with breast cancer, or who have a family history. The other would be in conjunction with a treatment that goes after the actual mutated DNA via chemo therapy or gene therapy. From what I'm reading this won't help directly against existing mutated genes. That said, if trials suggest it slows down reproduction of mutated genes, that very well may help as well, but I don't see that as being suggested.

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cheetah01Feb. 7, 1312:37 PM

In response to Starquest: "In before the first winger comes and asks how much taxpayer money was "wasted" on this research." This money isn't always from the government, though the National Institute of Health and National Science Foundation do provide funding. A lot of it comes from private industry and charity foundations. Without advancements like this, the follow-on medical research would never happen. It's also worth mentioning that this funding comes in the form of research grants that are very competitive. The potential for this type of research is great. These types of discoveries are what scientists hope for because they enable targeted therapies for cancer. These targeted therapies are significantly more effective and less harmful. My mother has breast cancer, and is lucky enough to have the version that has the HER2 protein over-expressed, because that has targeted therapies that provide higher survival rates than triple-negative breast cancer.

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