Ignore warnings of genocide? Never again

  • Article by: FRED M.B. AMRAM
  • Updated: February 1, 2013 - 7:38 PM

The world watched Nazi genocide coming eight decades ago. I was there.

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jimjimjimjimFeb. 1, 13 7:55 PM

As a liberal I demand we turn our back on the rest of the world and ignore the genocide. It is not our problem. We are not the worlds police. I once held hands with all of my neighbors from other countries and sang We Are The World, but I have decided we have no business interfering in their countries even if they are being slaughtered.

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wa0tdaFeb. 2, 1310:06 AM

Well, jimjim, how about if I as a conservative demand that we intervene unilaterally in every problem area around the globe, starting wars that last for decades and ultimately never solving the actual problems? After all, as good conservatives we in the USA always know what is best for everyone, everywhere, all the time. OTOH, we might consider what Mr. Amram is really suggesting and that is that the benefit of knowledge of what is happening outside our borders and early intervention is more likely to succeed at much less cost in lives and treasure for all involved. That can take place most efficiently if the world acts in concert, and that is something we really need to work on. Ignorance of world affairs is a common failing and leads to overestimating the likelihood of success with air strikes and proxy fighters in these situations. In an ideal scenario the remediation is a team effort and begins early, as Mr. Amram suggests.

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ljfromminFeb. 2, 1311:54 AM

To imply that the U.N. is a "team" wa0tda, is laughable. They can more aptly be descibed as "vocal bench warmers".

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lalahemFeb. 2, 13 2:29 PM

They knew. They all knew and they did nothing. not only did they nothing, they refused to take in the ones that escaped. The cost of that blatant neglect is something that we pay every day and we will continue to pay forever.

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bettles91365Feb. 2, 13 3:57 PM

Great article. Thank you for sharing your experience.

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jd55604Feb. 2, 13 5:53 PM

Using pictures of the holocaust to justify our country's bloody and never-ending global interventionism is ridiculous. It's almost as if this story was written by a pro-israel lobbying group.

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justthefactsFeb. 6, 13 8:37 AM

Professor Amram is very correct in his conclusion that "War is horrible." In fact that is the larger lesson of the Holocaust that wars of aggression are the "supreme crime" as they engender so many other war crimes, human rights abuses and also lead to further wars. Amram is also right to focus on "early intercession when we see the predictors of genocide, ethnic cleansing and crimes against humanity", the earlier points when it may be still be possible to use the "softer power" end of the R2P spectrum. Ideally the power of moral persuasion and leading by example is the best way. Unfortunately, however, the professor leaves out the huge problem of recent years, that the US-NATO-Israel alliance, having assumed the role of "policeman of the world--coalition of the willing" and its unwise launching of illegal, unjustified brutal wars as well as its commission of torture and other war crimes. In the absence of an official public account of post-9/11 U.S. counterterrorism programs, Americans (and others) must rely on unofficial accounts but yesterday "Globalizing Torture" (http://www.opensocietyfoundations.org/reports/globalizing-torture-cia-secret-detention-and-extraordinary-rendition), this comprehensive new report was released from the Open Society Justice Initiative, authored by Amrit Singh. It is said to provide "the most comprehensive account yet assembled of the human rights abuses associated with CIA secret detention and extraordinary rendition operations. It details for the first time what was done to the 136 known victims, and lists the 54 foreign governments that participated in these operations. It shows that responsibility for the abuses lies not only with the United States but with dozens of foreign governments that were complicit." The current hypocrisy that consequently underlies the US-NATO-Israel's actions, its extreme grandiose exceptionalism of claiming that human rights and humanitarian law of warfare only apply to lesser nation-states, and only when it happens to coincide with the US-NATO-Israel's "smart power" national interests, totally undercuts its power of moral persuasion and power to lead by example. What we therefore should seek to do to effectively repair the damage is come clean and end the hypocrisy which includes the perverted use of R2P interventionist doctrine on behalf of US national interests.

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