Chess champs defy stereotypes

  • Article by: NICHOLAS D. KRISTOF , New York Times
  • Updated: February 1, 2013 - 9:09 AM

Chess tends to be the domain of privileged schools whose star players have had their own personal chess coaches. Well, not the national champs.

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jjsbrwJan. 31, 13 7:16 PM

Why don't I ever hear conservative commentators celebrating the massive cuts in public education? Or police and firefighters? Almost 800, 000 fewer local and state public sector jobs and not even a peep? Why is that?

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comment229Feb. 1, 13 6:04 AM

After reading this, is there any doubt in your mind that America's priorities are screwed up? Saw Bill Gates on Colbert last night. Why doesn't the MPLS paper send him a copy of this article?

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comment229Feb. 1, 13 6:07 AM

Further, chess is arguably the cheapest after school activity that schools can provide. I would be willing to bet, that most of the adults either volunteer their time, or get paid VERY little. And it is funny/ironic too that even the kids who stereotype "chess players" will try it, and a funny thing happens. Anybody else ever see what happens to these tough guys after they learn the rules and play a few matches?

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sunshine59Feb. 1, 13 8:37 AM

From my point if view, I don't see money making a difference but passion and dedication making a difference. One adult set out to create a team. She was passionate about her game. That passion blossomed and grew to the success it is today. Volunteerism is on the decline, what a shame. I volunteer in our school district countless hours. I get few verbal thank yous but a ton of satisfaction knowing the students received something. It may be a small insignificant contribution, but I know I've made the difference in little ppl's lives. We all have passion about something. It's infectious. Maybe we can give away some of our passion?

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twspt7Feb. 1, 13 9:08 AM

"Education is the best escalator out of poverty, but for too many kids it's creaking to a standstill" One hears many voices claiming this country is headed in the wrong direction these days. As higher education costs soar and debt mounts, we hear calls for less opportunity to access our educational system, rather than more, because we can't afford it; yet, in truth, there is no better place this country could invest it's public dollars.

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pumiceFeb. 1, 13 1:32 PM

Speaking of shortsightedness, each item in this list from the article is more shortsighted than the previous item: "[S]imilar cutbacks are playing out all across America. In 35 states, inflation-adjusted school financing is below 2008 levels, according to the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. As of July, school districts have slashed 328,000 jobs since 2008, and budget cuts have devastated early childhood education that lays the foundation for children's lives."

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