Find out why military suicides are soaring

  • Article by: EDITORIAL , Philadelphia Inquirer
  • Updated: January 25, 2013 - 1:34 PM

More American soldiers took their own lives last year than were killed in combat in Afghanistan.

  • 9
  • Comments

  • Results per page:
  • 1 - 9 of 9
myvotecountJan. 25, 13 4:34 PM

Because of the recession many people joined the military rather than face years of unemployment. And once they got into the military they realized that it really sucks. If the US Government would stop flooding the labor market with cheap foreign labor then an ordinary blue collar guy could get a decent paying job rather than compete with fradulently documented workers for job, wages and benefits.

7
7
erikj3Jan. 25, 13 4:49 PM

It couldn't be because so many of them have been sent on 2, 3, 4 (or more) deployments, to some of the most hellish places on earth (Iraq and Afghanistan), only to come home and have to fight the very same government for benefits they earned and face a country that largely has forgotten those wars, could it?

11
2
bobthevetJan. 25, 13 5:31 PM

The public wants a limited number of service people to fight wars rather than have a draft or get out completely. You would be messed up if you have tour after tour in a war zone. When you went to Vietnam, you served 1 year and you were done unless you re-uped. On top of this, most drafted were single. The National Guard is now being used to fight overseas when National Guard was set up for the continental US defense. People in the National Guard are generally married, some with businesses and lots of financial responsible commitments with a house, spouse and children. Few draftees had any of this. As with most wars, the majority serving is poor and are minorities and see the National Guard the only chance to get an education and and to do something that creates an income but here in the USA. And, of course is the economy. Praise the big shot CEOs that send the jobs overseas - they only care about themselves to make a buck. They don't give a damn about what is good for the USA to employee people here. Buy anything today and it is made in China. Of course Service Men and Women commit suicide under these conditions. Bob, a Vietnam Vet

8
1
editor25Jan. 25, 13 6:08 PM

I believe the psychiatric drugs they put the soldiers on has something to do with it, especially the ssri antidepressants. Look it up: a side effect is suicide.

2
7
jdlellis1Jan. 25, 13 7:55 PM

Suicides across the nation are increasing and part of the problem is it appears to be a "copy cat" initiative for certain segment of our population; (e.g., GBLT teenagers, Young males via mass murders then suicide, suicide by cop), Even in the military, numerous suicides are from individuals who have not even served in combat. Tough times today? Perhaps, but compare today with living through a period such as the Civil War, Slavery, the Great Depression, etc.

4
7
dibblegonJan. 26, 13 9:23 AM

Tragic. One part i didnt understand ("Even though civilians commit suicide at a higher rate").....so the rate in the military is lower than the general populace ? Isnt it good that the rate is lower? Is the gist of the article that the military rate has increased over time?

2
1
hermajestyJan. 26, 1310:03 AM

Aside from the repeated deployments and the use of National Guard troops who signed up assuming that their enlistment period would consist of helping U.S. disaster victims or possibly patrolling the streets of U.S. cities after a civil disturbance (these were their main jobs in the past), might the suicides be due to a feeling that they saw and perhaps did horrible things for no good reason?

After all, the Iraq invasion was founded on lies and actually left the average Iraqi worse off than before. The Afghan War has featured endlessly shifting goalposts, and now U.S. forces are there to fight "militants" who see the U.S. as imperialist invaders.

So what normal person wouldn't react to seeing people blown to bits and risking his or her own life for four or five years on end--not to defend the U.S. from invaders, as in World War II, but for no good reason at all?

1
0
regionguyJan. 26, 13 4:26 PM

I agree with much of what the previous commenters say. But this is not the first time Guard units have been used overseas for long periods in multiple campaigns: in WWII, for example, all 18 Guard divisions were sent overseas and into combat. In fact, 4 of the first 5 Army divisions deployed were Guard divisions. Service was typically for the duration: the 34th infantry division was in campaigns from late 1942 through the end of the European war, for example. By the end of the war, 150,000 troops were transferred from Europe to fight in the Pacific. I can't help but think that this is a complex problem that is somehow different (at least in part) from previous wars.

0
0
simplicity1Jan. 27, 1311:38 PM

The young people of the military are fed a huge line of crap about what a wonderful life it is... and will lead to. Glory and Honor and free college etc. Then they find themselves in very dangerous situations in a far away places postponing plans and risking their lives for a cause which is not at all clear or justified... even to their leaders. They are give speed to stay awake and NyQuil to sleep. When some of them return home they find that most of the country is disengaged, disinterested, and non-supportive of what they've been doing. Some find their spouse has strayed and or spent their paychecks frivolously all the while fibbing during occasional communications. The suicides are not any one thing... it's the whole package that some of them are ill-equipped to deal with. The suicides are a clear sign of national political and military leadership failure. It is a sign of nation neglecting it's service members.

0
0
  • 1 - 9 of 9

Comment on this story   |  

ADVERTISEMENT

  • about opinion

  • The Opinion section is produced by the Editorial Department to foster discussion about key issues. The Editorial Board represents the institutional voice of the Star Tribune and operates independently of the newsroom.

  • Submit a letter or commentary
Connect with twitterConnect with facebookConnect with Google+Connect with PinterestConnect with PinterestConnect with RssfeedConnect with email newsletters

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT